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Full text of "Visions"



V5inN5TlB 



LOMA LINDA UNIVERSIT) 
LA SIERRA CAMPUS 




ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01873 8093 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/visions1978loma 




THE YEARBOOK OF= 

LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY LaSIERRA CAMPUS 



Josten's American Yearbook Co. 



This first edition of VISIONS, the Loma Linda 
University-La Sierra Campus yearbook, is 
dedicated to those who helped in its creation. 
To Meredith Jobe for sponsoring and actively 
participating in its early research. To the year- 
book staff for working untold number of hours 
for little or no pay, a small amount of praise 
and some creative satisfaction. To the six hun- 
dred subscribers who believed enough to place 
seven dollars of their hard earned money on a 
project that was just budding. And to the Lord, 
who believes in intervening and aiding frail 
human attempts to portray His glory. 




BLE OF CONTENT 



President and 
Vice Presidents 






Deans, Directors 
and Coordinators 

University Officers 

Dormatory Deans 

Theme 

Schools, Divisions 
and Departments 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

Activities and 
Organizations 

Sports 
Advertisers 




4 



6 
8 

10 
16 

42 
61 
73 
85 
99 

156 
165 



» • 



UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATORS 

THE PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENTS 



"The founders of Loma Linda University believed in a three-fold concept of 
education: the head, the heart, and the hand," says President V. Norskov Olsen. 
"The same could also be expressed as body, soul, and spirit; the body being the seat 
for our senses, the soul the seat for our will or ego, and the spirit the seat for our 
God-consciousness." 

"To Make Man Whole" exemplifies the University's purpose in education. In 
the achievement of its fundamental purpose, each part of the University has its own 
distinctive role. The Board of Trustees and the University administration provide 
the appropriate environment — the physical facilities, the personnel, and the in- 
tellectual and spiritual atmosphere. An able group of six vice-presidents assists 
President Olsen in administering the school policies. 

Norman J. Woods oversees the academic affairs of the University. Upon his 
shoulders rests the responsibility of maintaining a high degree of scholastic excel- 
lence through the hiring of faculty and monitoring of curriculum. 

Money is vital to the operation of any business, universities not excluded. George 
G. O'Brien keeps close check on the comings and goings of currency within the 
institution. 

Answering the needs of approximately 5,000 students is the job for a vice-presi- 
dent of student affairs. Tracy R. Teele handles housing, food and health services, 
counseling, placement, religious and extracurricular programs on both campuses. 

Donald G. Prior operates out of two offices as vice-president for public relations 
and development. Keeping the church advised of University activities, heading up 
alumni affairs, raising funds for the future of the University are a few of the items 
that keep Prior occupied. 

The vice-president for foundation affairs is Robert J. Radcliffe. His job involves 
the management of a financial investment fund supported by trusts, donations, 
and special business operations. 

Harrison S. Evans coordinates the Medical Center and School of Medicine in 
his position as vice president for medical affairs. He is the liaison with the Veterans 
and other affiliated hospitals, and is responsible for the coordination of clinical 
resources of the Medical Center with the needs of the health-related schools. 




Ill 




Dr. George G. O'Brien 

Vice President of Financial Affairs 



Dr. Norman J. Woods 
Vice President of Academic Affairs 



Dr. Harrison S. Evans 
Vice President of Medical Affairs 





Dr. V. Norskov Olsen, Ph.D. Dr. Theol 
President, Loma Linda University 




Mr. Donald G. Prior 
Vice President of Public Relations 



I 




Mr. Tracy R. Teele 
Vice President of Student Affairs 







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UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATORS 

THE DEANS, DIVISIONAL DIRECTORS, AND 
COORDINATORS 

The University's Statement of Purpose says the school is dedicated to helping its 
teachers and students — as individuals and as a community — to reach their highest 
potential in education, in research, and in service. College of Arts and Sciences 
Dean Ivan G. Holmes says, "Our concern for students at La Sierra is that they 
discover here their individual identity. Students should have a sense of belonging." 

Holmes maintains the achievement of this goal requires a close relationship with 
God on the part of students and faculty. "He is a Christian who aims to reach the 
highest attainments for the purpose of doing other's good," he says. 

Assisting Holmes in meeting the needs of a diversified student body are an asso- 
ciate dean, division director and coordinators. 

Harold E. Fagal is the associate dean. His responsibilities can be better described 
as student academic affairs, or keeping tabs on scholastic progress. 

Anees A. Haddad is the director of the director of the Division of Behavioral 
Sciences, Sociology, anthropology, psychology, social work, and marriage, family 
and child counseling are the departmental components in the study of man. 

One of the largest groups of requirements for graduation, outside of a student's 
major, are those in the humanities. Frederick G. Hoyt accounts for the assimilation 
of departments whose subjects are art, communication, English, history, modern 
languages, and music. 

William M. Allen looks after the natural sciences departments: biology, chem- 
istry, mathematics, and physics. More students major in these departments than in 
any other area. 

Wilfred M. Hillock directs the rapidly-growing collective gathering of profes- 
sional studies departments: agriculture, business, industrial studies, physical edu- 
cation and secretarial and business education. 



Dr. Ivan G. Holmes, Academic Dean 
Mr. Wilfred M. Hillock 



Dr. William M. Allen 



Dr. Frederick G. Hoyt 






Dr. Anees A. Haddad 



Dr. Harold E. Fagal 





LA SIERRA CAMPUS ADMINISTRATION 




Mr. Theodore H. Uren 
Business Administrator 



Mr. Harvey C.T. Johnson 
Assoc. Business Administrator 




Mr. Raymond Schoepflin 
Assoc. Director, Student Aid/Finance 

Mr. John T. Hamilton 
Director of Public Relations 



Mr. C. Roscoe Swan 
Assoc. Director Personnel 



Mr. Earl M. Gillespie 
Accountant 



Mrs. Bonnie L. Dwyer 
Public Information Officer 



Mr. David R. Dickerson 
Asst. Dean of Students 








Mr. Charles Soliz, Dean of Men 




MEN'S RESIDENCE 
HALL DEANS 



Mr. Kelly B. Bock, Asst. Dean 




Mr. Lloyd H. Wilson, Asst. Dean 




Mr. LaVern Wallace Roth, Asst. Dean 






Mrs. Laurene W. Jenkins, Dean of Women 




Miss Lynn Mayer, Asst. Dean 




Miss Verna A. Barclay. Assoc. Dean 



WOMEN'S 
RESIDENCE 
HALL DEANS 




Miss Marilyn R. Moon, Assoc. Dean Mrs. Anita M. Hayes, Asst. Dean 




A tree on a cliff 
Green and Strong, 
But twisted 

By the hostile environment. 
It draws on earthy elements 
To supply basic needs . . . 
Self sufficient, 
Struggling for life- 
Leaves and limbs stretch 
To catch vital, food-making 
Sunlight . . . 

Man, a social creature, 
Unlike the tree, 
Cannot stand alone. 
He is dependent on, 
The whims of nature, 
The skill of others, 
And most of all 
Upon Superior Guidance, 
To supply his strength 
Both mental and physical. 

He cannot shut himself 

From the world, 

He must send his roots 

Into the earth, 

Associating and communicating 

He must 



REACH O 




W' 







Man is not perfect, 

He makes mistakes. 

He tries to smooth over 

The rifts of life, 

But just makes ripples. 

He tries to help, 

Lending time, experience, 

And wisdom, 

To make life easier. 

But against the expanse 

Of our world 

His efforts are insignificant. 




12 





13 



14 





Here at La Sierra, 
Between the required 
And the electives, 
We strive to change, 
Mature, 

To be more effective 
people. 

To achieve an ideal 

We study, 

Mainly books, 

Sometimes people, 

But often it is not enough. 

Do we spend time with 

Our fellow man? 

Too often we are trapped 

Within ourselves, 

Thinking only of ourselves, 

To enrich ourselves. 

Why can't we stop, 

Lay the pen aside 

And touch the person 

Next to us? 

But no, 

That's too difficult. 



— Hi I 







16 




r 



Dr. Willard H. Meier 

Dean, School of Education 

also coordinator of 

Foundations of Education 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Philosophical, historical, social, and psychological 
studies in education undergird all professional prepar- 
ation programs of the School of Education. Also, the 
study of education is viewed as a worthy pursuit in and 
of itself. A course in the methods and materials of re- 
search in education prepares students of education to 
pursue research in their respective areas of special in- 
terest. The Department of Foundations of Education, 
then, serves the other departments of the School of 
Education as they prepare professionals for a variety 
of state and denominational credentials, but also it 
offers coursework leading to a Master of Arts degree 
for the serious student of education who wishes to study 
education for its own sake. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
CURRICULUM AND 
INSTRUCTION 

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction in 
the School of Education prepares teachers for schools, 
both denominational and public, all over the world. 
The liberal arts major, which is most commonly pur- 
sued by candidates for elementary teaching, has been 
used as a model program for several teacher education 
institutions in California. Professional preparation 
programs for multiple and single subject credentials as 
well as a variety of "Fifth Year" programs are ap- 
proved by the Commission for Teacher Preparation 
and Licensing in the state of California. Graduate pro- 
grams are available in Elementary Education, Secon- 
dary Teaching and Supervision of Curriculum and 
Instruction. 

Dr. Viktor A. Christensen 

Associate Dean, School of Education 

Chairman, Deaprtment of 

Curriculum and Instruction 




18 




Dr. Clifford L. Jaqua 
Chairman, Department of 
Educational Administration 



DEPARTMENT OF 

EDUCATIONAL 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Educational Administration pre- 
sently offers two graduate degrees, Master of Arts 
(M.A.) and Specialist in Education (ED.S.), designed 
to prepare professional personnel for various positions 
such as superintendent of schools, elementary and 
secondary school principals, administrators of academ- 
ics and student affairs, and school business manage- 
ment. By combining research, practical experience, and 
courses of study, a student may be prepared for a wide 
variety of administrative and supervisory careers in 
education. 

A program in educational leadership may be selected 
to fulfill the academic requirements for an administra- 
tor's credential from the State of California and/or the 
General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists. 




DEPARTMENT OF 

COUNSELOR 

EDUCATION 

Counselor Education is ... counselor education. 
Graduate programs are offered by the department 
to prepare counselors and school psychologists as 
facilitators of individual decision-making. Emphasis is 
on how to help others to help themselves with career 
choice, educational planning, personal affairs and self- 
understanding. A Master of Arts degree in counseling 
may be earned with or without a state pupil personnel 
services credential. Beyond the Master of Arts is a 
Specialist in Education degree which prepares candi- 
dates for activities related to school psychology, learn- 
ing evaluation, and corrective proceedures for children 
with problems in school. In all programs a balance is 
sought between academic book-learning and the ac- 
quisition of practical "hands on" experiences. 

Dr. Norman C. Maberly 
Chairman, Department of 
Counselor Education 



19 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Loma Linda University School of Nursing is committed to providing a 
balanced professional education in a Christian Environment. The faculty 
of the school places high value on the wholeness needs of mankind and 
consequently on the promotion of human and social welfare. The primary 
aim of nursing is to serve humanity by ministering to the body, mind, and 
spirit. Nursing is an art based on science, directed toward the promotion 
of physical and mental health, and the prevention of disease. It is a service 
to individuals, families, and communities. Aside from functions derived 
from medical authority, nursing has independent functions in the areas of 
wellness and health promotion. 

The nurse combines the work of healing with the work of helping indi- 
viduals and families reach their level of optimal functioning through a life 
style congruent with the laws of health. Nursing practice encompasses a 
diversity of experiences, ranging from the care of infants to the care of the 
elderly. Nurses practice in a variety of settings-from the hospital, with its 
many specialty needs to community agencies, where the challenge lies in 
providing necessary nursing care and teaching health promotion. Profes- 
sional opportunities in administration, teaching, clinical specialties, and 
the independent practice of nursing are avilable in the United States and 
overseas. The qualified student who is interested in people and in pro- 
viding health care will find a challenging, individualized role in the nursing 
profession. 




Valrie Rudge, Assoc. Dean, Undergraduate Division 



Pat Foster, Asst. Dean, Curriculum 




g 




Dr. Marilyn Christian 
Dean, School of Nursing 



Mildred Akamine 
Department Chairman, Community Health 




20 







Ronald Davis, Asst. Dean, 
Administration and Finance 



Esther Sellers, Chairman, Psych-Mental Health 
Ann Ross, Chairman, Medical-Surgical Nursing 






Clarice Woodward, Chairman 
Parent-Child Nursing 



Colleen Hewes, Chairman 
Gerontology Nursing 




DIVISION OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

The Division of Behavioral Sciences was created two 
years ago by the University Board as a new organizational 
structure to bring together five departments and two pro- 
grams into one interrelated family of like-disciplines. The 
Departments of Anthropology, Marriage and Family 
Counseling, Psychology, Social Work, and Sociology — 
and the Programs in Administration of Justice and in Mid- 
dle Eastern Studies were thus brought into a new unity 
that has proven of substantial benefit to all. 

Three departments and one program operate on the 
Graduate level thus creating a framework within which 
the Division serves not only the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences, but also several other schools, primarily the Gradu- 
ate School — about forty percent of the Division operations 
are on the Loma Linda Campus. Between 1,300 and 1,500 
students are served each quarter by the various entities of 
the Division. 

There is a concerted effort in our classes and research 
activities to interpret the theories of behavior science in the 
light of Adventist beliefs. Thus, thousands of our young 
people who want to take courses in our various disciplines 
have the opportunity of sitting safely and profitably in the 
classrooms of competent Adventist behavior scientists 
who are a rare commodity, increasing in demand as the 
Church continues to find successful methods for dealing 
with its internal and external challenges in an ultracomplex 
world of human behavior. 

We will continue, under God, to keep faith with you, 
our wonderful students and the future leaders of our 
church and our world. 







i 



Dr. Anees A. Haddad, Director-Behavioral Science 
Dr. Vern R. Andress, Coordinator-Admin, of Justice 




Dr. John W. Elick 
Chairman- Anthropology/Sociology 



Dr. Peter G. Strutz 
Chairman-Psychology 



Mrs. June H. Horsley 
Chairman-Social Service 



22 






Dr. Richard R. Banks 
Mrs. Mamie M. Ozaki 




Mr. Harold I. Sharpnack 





Mrs. Adeny S. Woods 
Dr. Clifford D. Achord 




v" 
Dr. Carolyn R. Howard 




S5F \ry 




Mr. Monte R. Andress 




Dr. Jerry M. Lee 




iff* 






> 



» 





Dr. Walter Specht, Dean 



Dr. Harold E. Fagal 





Dr. J. Cecil Haussler 



Dr. Kenneth L. Vine 



• 




Dr. Theodore J. Chamberlain 






To accomplish its mission in the 
world, the church has a growing need 
for capable young men and women who 
have a thorough education in religion — 
as well as a solid personal religious 
commitment. 

On the La Sierra campus of Loma 
Linda University, the Division of 
Religion is helping to supply this need 
by preparing students for various forms' 
of pastoral as well as education min- 
istry. 

Education in religion is the highest 
kind of learning — because it is a person- 
al encounter with ultimate issues and 
internal values. 

A major in religion is no easy road to 
a college degree. Besides calling for 
certain basic ability, it requires both 
dedication and discipline. It demands, 
and certainly deserves, a student's best 
efforts. 

The academic vigor of LLU's Divi- 
sion of Religion is personified in its 
highly trained faculty. This faculty is 
distinguished by writing and research 
accomlishments as well as pastoral and 
teaching skills. Manuscripts in process 
draw on the disciplines of old testa- 
ments, archeology, christian, virtue, 
church, reformation history, theology, 
and social ethics. Such engagement in 
writing as research can enhance class- 
room discovery. 

In addition to classroom activities 
and individual study, education in re- 
ligion at Loma Linda University involve 
opportunities for personal participation 
and leadership in witnessing and ser- 
vice — opportunities that occur through- 
out the school year, and in special sum- 
mer programs, and include campus 
life, nearby churches, and communities 
action projects. 

Varied curricular activities provide 
partial experience. "Externship" makes 
it possible for ministerial and educa- 
tional studies majors to find direct in- 
volvment in local churches. Clinical 
pastoral education is possible at LLU 
Medical Center. And summer study in 
Israel is an option elected by selected 
students who desire field work in arche- 
ology and Biblical studies. 

Further, extra curricular activities 
allow classroom theory to be translated 
into life. The Campus Ministries offer 
diverse programs for witness and ser- 
vice. The City Parish Congregation 
unite faculty and students from both 
campuses to actively find involvment 
in the worships and witness dimensions 
of congregational life in a small church 
setting. 

Through study, research, writing, 
teaching and doing, the Division of Re- 
ligion faculty and students seek to con- 
tribute skills and commitment in opera- 
tionalizing the term "Christian Univer- 
sity." 






Dr. V. Bailey Gillespie 



24 






Dr. Paul J. Landa 



Dr. F. Lynn Mallery 



Dr. Robert Osmunson 






Dr. Richard Rice 



Dr. Charles W. Teel Jr. 



Elder David Osbourne. Chaplain 





,; 1|,: km 



Elder John J. Robertson 



Dr. Norval Pease 



25 




Mr. John E. Carr, Chairman 





Dr. Fred W. Riley 



Mr. Arnold C. Boram 




I 




EVERYBODY HAS TO 
EAT 

The Department of Agriculture 

Everybody has to eat and somebody has to provide 
the food to eat. The Agriculture Department is active 
in producing food and teaching interested students how 
to produce food. By combining commercial production 
with its academic programs, the Agriculture Depart- 
ment is able to offer career work experience as well as 
a college degree. 

Students looking forward to a career can specialize 
in Intensive Food Production, Plant Sciences, Dairy 
Science, and Poultry Science. Students who are only 
interested in providing food for their own needs can 
take classes which offer practical experience and tan- 
gible results. Students who complete the Vegetable 
Gardening class know that if the future doesn't promise 
all they hope for, at least they won't have to go hungry. 

The rapid growth of the department to its current 
size of 45 majors plus the increase in the number of 
non-majors taking classes is a reflection of two factors. 
First is a greater awareness among students of the need 
to learn some skills for a changing lifestyle. Second is 
the increasing need for more and better food around 
the world. The expanding career opportunities for 
Food Producers both in the U.S. and throughout the 
world is now at the point where there are more jobs 
than skilled job applicants. 

To meet the needs, the department is involved in 
training and research to prepare Food Producers for 
both domestic and international employment. Through 
the Loma Linda University Agriculture Assistance 
Program, the department is participating in projects 
in several countries outside the U.S. This participation, 
involving both faculty and students, demonstrates that 
not only is there a need but that the Agriculture De- 
partment is actively engaged in meeting some specific 
needs and providing a vital service to the church, com- 
munity and the world. 




Mr. Harry M. Grubbs 
Mr. Richard L. Peterson 



Mr. Dale L. Anderson 



Mr. George R. Burgdorff 



26 








Mr. Roger A. Churches, Chairman 

THE DEPARTMENT OF 
ART 

The art department serves art-oriented majors and 
general students. All beginning courses are open to any 
major from any department. 

The art department feels that we all have a respon- 
sibility to the whole man — to the creative and intuitive 
(albeit non-verbal) right hemisphere of the brain, as 
well as to the cognitive and verbal left hemisphere. 
Through the arts we are able to reach, to open, to un- 
derstand our non-verbal right hemisphere. Studies in 
art help the student explore and put more meaning into 
the visual and spacial objects the right hemisphere 
perceives. In studying especially the basic elements of 
line, texture, plane, and dimension, the student is able 
to grasp and understand the abstract elements (per- 
ceived in the left hemisphere). An appreciation for these 
abstract elements as well as the more obvious element 
of color is also a departmental concern. 

In the study of art, its order, we attempt to come clo- 
ser to understanding the meaning of the world's crea- 
tion — and the image of God through it — God as a play- 
fully creative and happy god. 

We are interested in shaping artists who are inter- 
acting with the aforementioned elements. Some possi- 
ble professional outlets for the student include sculp- 
tors, painters, designers, potters, teachers, Commercial 
artists, bio-medical illustrators, photographers and 
printmakers. 




Mr. Robert H. Seyle 




Dr. Agnes R. Eroh 




Mr. Clarence L. Grav 





4/H^^ " ; v- : . .W*-"'. """■"■" 




Dr. C. Douglas Eddleman 
Associate Chairman 



Dr. Leonard R. Brand-Chairman 





<zs 



Dr. Anthony W. Lewis 



Dr. Lester E. Harris 



Mrs. Carolann R. Rosario 



BIOLOGY AT LOMA 
LINDA UNIVERSITY- 
STRENGTH AND 
VARIETY 

In addition to having a staff of teachers who are 
committed to the welfare of students and the Chris- 
tian ideals of Loma Linda University, the biology 
department has several other assets that add 
strength to the program. The department has a gra- 
duate program that offers M.A. and Ph.D. degrees 
in biology. Association with the graduate program 
add strength to the undergraduate program by in- 
creasing the variety of courses available, and by 
stimulating more interest in research. A goal of the 
department is to strengthen this relationship by 
combining the undergraduate and graduate pro- 
grams on one campus. Faculty research currently 
in progress on the La Sierra Campus includes cyto- 
logical studies of insect reproduction by Douglas 
Eddleman and study of the population genetics of 
yeast by Gary Bradley. The department encourages 
student research, expecially through the research 
curriculum, which provides more opportunity for 
undergraduate involvement in research and research 
seminars. 

Antoher strength of the biology department is the 
variety of field station courses that it offers. There 
are two biology field stations in the Galapagos Is- 
lands, and one of them is operated by the Loma Lin- 
da University Department of Biology. We teach at 
least one course there each summer. Also we are 
affiliated with the Walla Walla marine biology 
field station near Anacortes, Washington, where a 
variety of courses are taught each summer. Our 
third option is a wilderness ecology course taught 
each summer in the California mountains. 

The 200+ biology majors are receiving training 
that prepares them for further training and jobs in 
research, college, academy, or professional school 
teaching, forestry, environmental study and pollu- 
tion control or for further study in medical fields. 






28 







'''■■■ v*-w 



"*<• >^ 






Mr. Robert M. Ford Jr. Chairman 
Mr. Donald J. Byrd 



Mr. Wilfred M. Hillock 
Dr. Antoine G. Jabbour 



Mr. William J. Key 



HOW'S BUSINESS 

An enrollment burst three years ago in the Business 
and Economics Department has been followed by con- 
tinued increases of 15 to 30 students every year. The 
current enrollment total is 200: 65 accounting, 125 man- 
agement and 10 food service management. 

A Master's program in Hospital Administration 
has been recently approved to be operated cooperative- 
ly with the Department of Health Administration. In 
addition the department is developing plans for an 
external degree program and also for a program at 
South China Union College in Hong Kong. 

Current chairman Robert Ford assumed leadership 
in 1977, following five years of teaching in the depart- 
ment. Wilfred Hillock, previous chairman, continues 
to teach, in addition to assuming the role of coordina- 
tor for the professional and applied programs of Loma 
Linda University. 

The department emphasized extracurricular activ- 
ities. These include an annual (8th consecutive) excur- 
sion to the Colorado River. In addition, seminars pro- 
vide vital enrichment and integration of the curriculum, 
and teacher-student contacts with the business com- 
munity at large. The result is constant nurture and an 
acquaintance with current trends. 

Business is good. 




Mr. Lee Becker 



Mr. Lann\ R. Stout 




BETTER LIVING 
- THROUGH CHEMISTRY 



Dr. Lawrence W. Botimer 
Mr. H. Raymond Shelden 



Dr. William M. Allen, Chairman 
Dr. Ronald A. Galaway 




Dr. Clyde Webster Dr. Leland Y. Wilson 

Dr. H. Raymond Shelden II 



While some may feel (the well known commercial 
slogan suggests) Chemists earn a larger income, the 
Chemistry Department feels it plays a major role in 
preparing students for a better life. The Department 
serves a broad spectrum of students planning careers 
not only in Chemistry, but in the Health Professions, 
Biochemistry, Biology and Education. 

The Department feels it has not reached its fullest 
goals in teaching about the atoms and molecules of 
the submicroscopic world unless it also makes appli- 
cation of these principles to daily life. Such issues as 
environmental pollution, nutrition, synthetic materi- 
als, and the application of Chemistry to the problems 
of society are given significant attention. The Chemis- 
try graduate is provided the mental and physical tools 
to analyse many of the problems of society and plan 
reasonable approaches to solutions. 

The Department faculty and staff continue to ma- 
ture and develop. This year Janice Chaney has done 
well in coordination the activities of the stockroom 
and laboratory as well as taking up some of the slack 
when Dr. Zaugg broke his back fall quarter. Dr. Web- 
ster will divide his time between Chemistry and the 
Geo-science Research Institute giving him more time 
for research. This year Dr. Allen took on the added 
responsibilities of coordinator of the Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics. 

Further broadening of the Department offerings 
this year found a group of summer school students 
traveling through out California in Earth Science 
Field Work. Seminars series delt with Environmen- 
tal Pollution, Symmetry and Crystal Structure. The 
highlight of the year was a workshop and lecture by 
internationally known chemist Hubert Alyea. 



Dr. Wayne E. Zaugg 



30 




V»~ 





Dr. Roberta J. Moore, Chairman 

DEPARTMENT OF 

COMMUNICATION 

The Department of Communication includes three 
different areas, each with a program leading to a 
bachelor's degree and in addition, a master's degree in 
one. 

First of all is speech, familiar to all students because 
one of the general studies requirements in the College 
of Arts and Sciences is SPCH 104, fundamentals of 
speech. The department offers both a major and a 
minor in speech, with several courses in drama as well 
as public address. 

Then there is speech pathology/audiology, or com- 
municative disorders. This is the largest area, with 
four full-time and several part-time teachers. The pro- 
gram now has 30 majors at the undergraduate level 
and 15 at the master's. The facilities of the Speech and 
Hearing Center, with more than 100 patient visits each 
week, provide a variety of clinical experience for stu- 
dents who log at least 300 clinic hours by the end of 
their fifth year. 

Early in the fall quarter of this school year, after 
the faculty submitted a 400-page evaluation, the State 
of California gave the program the clinical-rehabilita- 
tive services credential (language, speech and hear- 
ing). This credential enables students to work as speech 
pathologists in school districts of the State. 

The department also offers a major and a minor 
in mass media, with courses in both pring and broad- 
cast media; this year about 20 students have chosen 
this major. One of the features which attracts them to 
the program is a number of internships, in public re- 
lations as well as media. In the winter quarter, for 
example, the Adventist Radio, Television and Film 
Center, in Thousand Oaks, takes six to eight students 
for full-time on-the-job training in each of its several 
departments. 

Besides a major and a minor in mass media, the 
department of communication, in cooperation with 
three other departments, offers three interdepartment- 
al programs: with secretarial, specialization as an 
editorial secretary; with English, a major in writing; 
and with industrial studies a sequence in photojournal- 
ism and film. 




^^P 




Dr. Brian J. Jacques 

Mrs. Charlotte A. Blankenship 



Dr. E. Evelyn Britt 




Mr. Robert S. Stretter Mr. Stephen M. Bottroff 

Mr. Jack L. Hartley 




••x-j.- ( 



31 




. 



! 



CRS - SOMETHING 
FOR EVERYONE 

The Consumer Related Sciences Department is 
The Indispensable Department. It deals in basics: 
food, home and housing, clothing, consumerism, and 
family life. The teachers in CRS are specialists in fields 
that concern each individual. Their expertise serves 
more than the seventy majors in the department. These 
students are preparing for professions in: home eco- 
nomics education, child development, clothing and 
textiles, pre-dietetics, and nutrition care services. 

The department serves each college student who 
wishes to increase his skill in achieving quality life. 
Doctor, lawyer, merchant, chief- all can enhance their 
professions by acquiring skills taught in CRS. The 
staffs commitment to enriching life has had its side 
affects. They are not merely academicians, but also 
hold credentials in a variety of other professions. 

Doctor, lawyer, merchant, chief, meet- in addition 
to teacher specialists in the fields listed above- nurse, 
musician, carpenter, physical therapist, florist, author, 
composer. All are teachers in CRS. All are dedicated 
to improving life and living for everyone. 



Mrs. Mary P. Byers, Chairman 
Mrs. Judy E. Osborne 



J 





/ 



Mrs. Yvonne E. Sonneland 
Mrs. Dinah S. Baker 




32 



--»-- 



^ - 



ENGLISH AND WRITING MAJORS— 
THEY'RE INTERESTED IN MORE 
THAN TEACHING 

English and Writing majors are among the most 
interesting and intelligent people on campus. They're 
also clever. 

Picture your average major. He engages in witty 
and heated discussions of topics profound and trivial, 
reads entertaining and thoughtful stories, recites lines 
from plays at the top of his lungs to amuse or annoy 
his friends. He goes to plays, concerts, and museums 
because (of all things) he enjoys them. There is not 
many of him — twenty or, if we really exaggerate, thirty, 
plus a dozen grads. At the end of four or five years 
he may go into teaching — or fire off an application on 
the spur of the moment and go into medicine. Or law. 
Or television. 

In contrast, picture a well-known campus stereo- 
type. The pre-med studies biology all night and day 
until cats come out his ears and frogs his mouth, never 
reads anything interesting, and has little time to amuse 
(or annoy) his woman with lines from an Elizabethan 
sonnet-writer. At the end of four years of college, he 
is rejected by twenty medical schools and starts sell- 
ing insurance. 

Your English or Writing major knows he'll have to 
work someday, but wants to experience life at the same 
time. Who ever said that an English major never dies, 
he just teaches away? Keep an eye on him. He might 
just take your place in dentistry next year. 




Dr. Robert P. Dunn 
Chairman 
Yearbook Sponsor 





v -, / 




Dr. Victor Griffiths 
Mrs. Marlys C. Owen 



Dr. Richard B. Lewis 

Mrs. Nancy J. Lecourt 



Dr. Grosvenor R. Fattic 





33 







Dr. Delmer G. Ross 



34 



Dr. Frederick G. Hoyt, Chairman 

HISTORY AND 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Turn to pages 1 14 and 1 15 in the Loma Linda 1976- 
1978 Bulletin and you will find what the History and 
Political Science Department feels are the three most 
fascinating and intellectually stimulating majors on 
campus: History, History and Political Science, and 
Western Thought. In addition to the above programs 
the History Department is presently working with 
Modern Languages on the Latin American Studies 
Major and the new International Dimensions pro- 
gram, a two year sequence which meets most of the gen- 
eral requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree, 
while concentrating on the study of international af- 
fairs. 

Another special program offered under the History 
and Political Science Department is the Legislative 
Internship. Thus far, four Loma Linda University 
students have gone to, Washington D.C., for a quarter 
to work in a congressional office. Next fall another 
student will have the chance to benefit from this 
worthwhile experience. 

For graduate students the department offers two 
programs: an M.A. in History through the Graduate 
School, and an M.A. in the teaching of History in 
cooperation with the School of Education. Fellow- 
ships and Assistantships are available for these pro- 
grams. 

The goals of students pursuing the various degrees 
offered in the History and Political Science Depart- 
ment are varied. Some will pursue their studies as 
preparation for Law School, others for teaching, per- 
haps a career in Library reference work, or historical 
research. Whatever your plans for the future, the 
eight professors (all possessing lawed Ph.D.'s) in the 
History and Political Science Department feel that 
our curriculums offer a broad based liberal educa- 
tion which would benefit both those specializing in 
the field and those continuing in professional schools 
such as medicine or dentistry. To maintain classes in 
which intellectual and personnel growth may develop 
is our present and future goal. 





Dr. Melvin G. Holm 



Mr. Arthur Walls 



Dr. Donald Bower, Chairman 




Mr. Neal Stevens 




Mr. Terry James 




INDUSTRIAL STUDIES 
DEPARTMENT 

Where workers and teachers prepare for 
work. 

Donald G. Bower, EdD (preengineering and vo- 
cational) has served as a department chairman nearly 
every year of his 35 years of teaching. He has spent 
nine years in agricultural teaching and management. 

Melvin G. Holm, EdD (wood technology and metal 
machines) spent several years as a liaison engineer in 
the aerospace industry. 

Arthur M. Walls, M.A. (auto, welding, aircraft) 
serves on the advisory board for the California State 
Fair in Sacramento. He also serves on the California 
Counsel on Industrial Teacher Education. He is the 
National College Automotive Teachers Association 
membership chairman. 

Neal G. Stevens, B.A. (photography) is a profes- 
sional photographer with a B.S. in art. His skills of 
building and repairing cameras is much appreciated. 
He plans to spend time in Europe during a part of 
next summer for recreation and work. 

Aubry Kinzer (aviation instructor) at one time pre- 
vented himself from freezing to death during an Alask- 
an flight mishap. He carefully burned his log book page 
by page until he was rescued. 

Clifton G. Gent (aviation instructor) has served as 
an instructor in the Navy. He was a formation flight 
trainer. During that time he made more than 200 
carrier landings without accident. 

Merle D. Morse, B.A. (Loma Linda Campus auto 
instructor) has build numerous dune buggies with 
his welding skills. 

Although Terry James (wood technology) is a senior 
student on this campus he has rebuilt his corvette body 
into an original, high-performance, machine. 




- 



35 



THE DEPARTMENT THAT 

COUNTS-Mathematics 

Where on campus can you find a baseball umpire, 
an ornithologist, a magician, an automobile repairman 
and a computer specialist? If you guessed the Mathe- 
matics Department, then you are correct. 

Carlyle Flemming is the umpire for Little League 
baseball in his spare time. He also does statistical 
consultation, teaches a full load and works on his doc- 
torate at U.C.R. 

Vernon Howe spends his summers investigating the 
habits of birds in Northern Canada, and teaches a 
class in ornithology in addition to his mathematics 
courses. 

Barry Graham performs startling magic tricks as a 
hobby, while preparing some ideas from his recent 
doctoral dissertation for publication. 

Geoffrey Jones can often be found helping to get 
someone's car running when he is not teaching, per- 
forming the duties of chairman, or presenting a talk 
to a convention of mathematicians in some far away 
city. 

Hilmer Besel, besides teaching for the Mathematics 
Department, is also the one everybody runs to for 
help when something goes wrong with the campus 
computer system. He helps teachers use the computer 
as an instructional tool. 

There are 33 Math majors including 2 studying bio- 
mathematics and 14 in computing. For practical skills 
students can choose to learn how to create mathema- 
tical models of biological phenomena and apply their 
knowledge to the life sciences. On the other hand, 
they might prefer to study data processing and comput- 
er science in order to prepare for the business world. 
Still others decide to persue the B.A. in mathematics, 
which is designed to prepare high school teachers. 
Finally, there are those pure mathematicians who will 
go on to graduate school and become research con- 
sultants or college professors. 





Dr. Geoffrey T. Jones 
Chairman 



Dr. Vernon W. Howe 






Dr. Barry G. Graham 



Mr. Hilmer W. Besel 



Mr. Carlyle D. Flemming 



36 



M odern Languages is more than a department full of 

O bjects, ideas, books, teachers, papers, 

D esks, and students. Learning is an 

lL xperience that goes beyond memorizing and 

R ecollecting data. Instead, it must lead to 

.N ew horizons in approaching life, the world, and God. 

L iterature opens the gates to the thoughts, 

A. ncient and new, of men who have searched for 

JN ew answers to old questions; and language study 
brings 

vJ reater appreciation and understanding of the 

U nceasing quest of man to improve expression 

A. nd communication. As we study the form and 

(j enesis of the thoughts of others, our own become 

-C specially meaningful, and we are ready to revise 
them, 

•J ee error, and grow in life, the world, and God. 





Dr. Margarete L. Hilts 
Chairman 



Dr. Edward Ney 





Mr. Jaques Benzakein 



Miss Ruth E. Burke 




Dr. Ernestina Garbuit 



?- 



Dr. Allen H. Craw 
Chairman 






Dr. Perry W. Beach 




Mr. Harold B. Hannum 






V v 



; 




Mrs. Anita Olsen 



Dr. Joann R. Robbins 



MUSIC-A Blending of Theory and Practice 

Theory and Practice! Music students are exposed to a lot of both at 
La Sierra! They study with 7 full-time faculty and 8 part-time contract 
teachers. The students range in ability from rank beginners to budding 
artists majoring in Performance. They take majors in Music Education, 
Music Performance and Church Music. Non-majors are offered courses 
in music appreciation, music history, church music and aesthetics. 

The Music Department has many roles to fill: it provides music for 
worship services, music for entertainment at banquets, music for tours 
to churches and other schools; young recitalists share their long hours 
of preparation with their classmates and friends; the choirs, bands and 
chamber ensembles concertize. 

Four of the seven full time faculty have doctorates and two are doctoral 
candidates. The newest Ph.D. belongs to Dr. Don Thurber, who did his 
dissertation research evaluating by survey the music education programs 
in U.S. Adventist Academies. 

The most recent innovation in music organizations is the College- Com- 
munity Concert Band, directed by Robert Uthe. 

The most dramatic physical transformation has been the rebuilding 
and enlargement of the La Sierra church organ by Donald Vaughn and 
his students. Although Mr. Vaughn has repaired and rebuilt the organ 
for many years, it has been expanded to four times the original size dur- 
ing this past year. 

Dr. Joann Robbins has introduced class voice for beginning students, 
and reports that it is a good "support system" for young singers lack- 
ing confidence. They learn not only by doing, but by observing the pro- 
gress of their classmates. 

The piano students of Mrs. Anita Alsen are very active in presenting 
recitals, and have also been winners in contests such as the Redlands 
Bowl, So. Calif. Junior Bach Festival, and the Calif. Ass'n. of Profes- 
sional Music Teachers. 

One of the highlights of the musical year is the Annual Concerto Night. 
Introduced 20 years ago this spring by Dr. Perry Beach, it presents a 
rare opportunity for music students to perform concertos with orchestral 
accompaniment. Students of Dr. Beach and Mrs. Olsen are accompanied 
by the LLU Chamber Orchestra, directed by Claire Hodgkins, contract 
instructor in strings and string ensembles. 

A $15,000 Ford Foundation Grant provided the necessary funding 
for a recent recording of Dr. Perry Beach's sacred cantata "Then Said 
Isaiah" by Crystal Records. It was recorded by the Mitzelfelt Chorale, 
Orchestra and soloists. 

After more than 40 years of teaching music in Adventist colleges, 
former Music Department Chairman Harold Hannum is retiring from 
active teaching duties this spring. An Emeritus Professor at LLU, Mr. 
Hannum has been a prolific writer, contributing articles on Church mu- 
sic to Review and Ministry magazines, and two books, Music and Wor- 
ship, and Christian Search for Beauty. 

The present Music Department Chairman, Dr. H. Allen Craw, has 
been chosen to write the article concerning 18th century Czech pianist 
J.L. Dussek, for the 6th edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Mu- 
sicians. Dr. Craw did his Ph.D. dissertation on Dussek, who was a con- 
temporary of Beethoven. As an outgrowth of that research, Dr. Craw is 
also editing two volumes of Dussek's piano music. 

Since 1970 the Music Department has sponsored summer workshops 
in Choral and Orchestral Conducting and Performance. The Master 
Teachers are prominent European musicians. Herbert Blomstedt is 
Music Director of the Dresden State Orchestra and the Swedish Radio 
Symphony Orchestra. Sir David Willcocks is Director of the Royal Col- 
lege of Music in London and Conductor of the London Bach Choir. Prior 
to this, for 17 years, Sir Willcocks directed the fame King's College Choir 
of Cambridge University. 




P 





38 



Mr. Donald Thurber 



Mr. Robert Uthe 



Mr. Donald Vaughn 




:mkv. wmmmm 
Mr. Eugene W. Nash 





J 



Dr. Walter S. Hamerslough, Chairman 



Miss Helen I. Weismever 






Mr. Aubrey Chevalier 



Miss L. Janene Turner 



Carla Freeman 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, HEALTH 
AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

The Physical Education Department has a wide 
range of responsibilities. Fifty activity classes are of- 
fered in the general studies program including archery, 
jogging, skating, swimming, cycling, tennis, golf, back- 
packing, racquetball and horseback riding. Majors 
are offered in physical education and health and physi- 
cal education for students preparing for the teaching 
profession. General equestrian, therepeutic, and out- 
door recreation programs are offered for individuals 
in non-teaching areas. The major in health science 
prepares students for careers in the health professions 
as well as providing a major for the pre-professional 
student. The department also supervises the pre-physi- 
cians and assistants program. There are currently 65 
health science majors and 85 physical education majors. 

Recreation is "big business" at La Sierra. The 
intramural program includes five activities for women, 
seven for men and five co-ed. Additional time is pro- 
vided for non-structured leisure time activities. 

The Department is also responsible for the Bill Dopp 
Equestrian Center. Riding classes are offered in both 
English and western style for students and community; 
horses are boarded and trained and a horse show is 
held each month. 

The physical education facilities proved an oppor- 
tunity for education and wholesome recreation. So 
that one's education may be complete, the physical as 
well as the mental and spiritual self must be cared for 
in a Christian setting. 




Judy Wilson 



39 



gllHH 

Ulttllfll 




Dr. James W. Riggs, Chairman 

r 



Mr. Lee 




Mr. Richard Bobst 



40 




THE DEPARTMENT THAT 
EXPLAINS THE UNIVERSE 

To explain the universe in terms of physical laws 
is the goal of physicists. Such a person is Albert E. 
Smith. He has spent a number of years in teaching, 
administrative work in SDA colleges, and optical re- 
search in industry, before joining the faculty of the 
LLU Physics Department. He has an active interest 
in the optical properties of apertures, writing a book 
on optics, Darwinana, gardening, hiking mountain 
trails, and bird watching anywhere. Dr. Smith has 
been with the department since 1971. 

Richard L. Bobst is a former student and graduate 
of the LLU Physics Department. During his under- 
graduate days he worked in a print shop at Corona 
with Wilfred Hillock. When Hillcok left the shop, 
Bobst was made manager. Following graduation, he 
taught high school physics, received his master's degree 
in physics, and was on the physics staff under Dr. Al- 
bert Smith at Atlantic Union College. Mr. Bobst has 
been a faculty member at LLU since 1968. He is an 
ardent jogger and enjoys hiking the trails of the high 
Sierra mountains with his family. 

James W. Riggs, Jr. is also a former graduate of 
LLU, having graduated in 1947. Before coming to 
LLU, he colporteured for a year, taught church school 
in Texas, and spent two years in the U.S. Navy Medi- 
cal Corp. Riggs has been a member of the LLU faculty 
since his graduation, and became chairman of the 
department in 1959. He is retiring from full-time teach- 
ing in 1978 and is looking forward to a more relaxed 
program with some travel, Russian language study, 
amateur radio, photography, reading, and gardening. 

Lester H. Cushman and Donald E. Lee are part- 
time instructors. Cushman has taught physics and 
mathematics at LLU for over forty years and Lee was 
on the staff of the Physics Department a number of 
years before serving the registrar until just recently. 




Mr. Lester Cushman 





Dr. Lois E. McKee, Chairman 



Mrs. Dinah S. Baker 



DEPARTMENT OF 
SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS 
EDUCATION 

Wherever there is an office there has to be an of- 
fice worker with secretarial or stenographic skills and 
training. One of the many advantages of secretarial 
work is that employment opportunities exist in com- 
munities of every size. The U.S. Department of Labor 
says that the "Employment of secretaries is expected 
to increase faster than the average for all occupations 
through the mid-1980's as the continued expansion of 
the business and government creates a growing volume 
of paper work." Within the Seventh-day Adventist 
denomination the demand for secretaries continues to 
increase each year. Loma Linda University Depart- 
ment of Secretarial and Business Education is helping 
to fill this need by training its 45 majors not only in 
the basics for secretarial work in any office, but also 
by giving specific instruction for a variety of special- 
ized areas. 

A secretary may choose to work in a "one girl" 
office with only a few persons where she will have the 
opportunity of performing a wide variety of duties. 
Should she choose a large organization, she has the 
possibility of advancement into administrative and 
supervisory roles. Management-level positions await 
those who continue to grow professionally. 

If a secretary decides to specialize, the opportuni- 
ties are excitingly varied. On the La Sierra Campus 
of Loma Linda University, the four-year student may 
choose to take the general program in secretarial ad- 
ministration, or she may choose to specialize as an 
editorial, educational, legal, or medical secretary. 
Should she be interested in teaching, business educa- 
tion would be her choice. 

When circumstances prevent the student from finish- 
ing a four-year course, she may choose to get an As- 
sociate of Arts degree in either general stenographic 
or medical office assisting in two years. 

The teachers in the department, Charlene Baker, 
Faye Chamberlain, and Lois McKee, are committed to 
the task of providing the most comprehensive, up-to- 
date education in the secretarial field that is possible 
for the students who come to La Sierra. 




Mrs. Faye M. Chamberlain 



41 



42 



L 




SENIORS 




Maged Abu-Assal 

Chemistry 
Rachel Acosta 

Psychology 
Olga Aguilar 

Social Service/Religion 
Cathy Almada 

Art/Design 
Catherine Anderson 

Elementary Education 



Ellen Andersson 

Graduate 
Karen Archbold 

Accounting 
Sandra L. Arct 

Journalism 

Public Relations 
Rhonda K. Arnold 

English 



Doris A. Arthur 

Behavioral Science 
Richard G. Atchley 

Psychology 
Michael D. Bailey 

Ministerial Studies 
Gary L. Baker 

Management 
Phyllip L. Baker 

Ministerial Studies 



Rozelle Jenee Barber 

Biology 
Leigh N. Barker 

Journalism 

Public Relations 
Bonnie S. Barrows 

Medical Secretarial 

Administration 
Robert Bartholomew 

Industrial Studies 



Philip Beach 

Biology 
Richard Becker 

Chemistry 
Cynthia K. Behr 

History 
Daniel Berger 

Management 
Sara Berhanu 

Biology 



Victoria S. Bianco 

Social Service 
Sharon C. Biggs 

Accounting 
Joann Bischoff 

Health Science 
Michael Bishai 

Accounting 
Thomas Blackwelder 

Graduate 



Byron Blomquist 

Biology 
Jerry Bobbitt 

Industrial Studies 
Mark Bohner 

Health Science 
Samuel Bolivar 

Health Science 



44 




Kurt Bower 

Religion 
Bette E. Bowns 

Mathematics 
Louis A. Bozzetti 

Biology 
Ronald Breeder) 

Psychology 
Josephine Brigham 

Home Economics 



Barbara Brooks 

Graduate 
Diana Broomfield 

Biology 
Alan Brown 

Psychology 
Terry Brown 

Biology 
Bill Buckendahl 

Biology 



Marcia Burford 
Health/Physical 
Education 

Sherry Burishkin 
Behavioral Science 

John Campbell 
Religion 

Ritchie Carbajal 
Ministerial Studies 
Health Science 



Carla A. Carnes 

Sociology 
Franice L. Carney 

Liberal Arts 
Edgar H. Castellanos 

Health Science 
Samuel R. Catalon 

Religion 
Sheryl L. Chafin 

Accounting 



Chin-Lee L. Chan 

Biophysics 
Janie M. Chaname 

Spanish 
Keith Cheng 

Biomathematics 
Man-Kam K. Cheung 

Chemistry 



Kwang S. Chung 

Mathematics 
Leilani S. Chung 

Health Science 
Donald C. Cicchetti 

Religion 
Stephen W. Clegg 

Religion 
Robert T. Cook 

Biochemistry 



45 




Wilfredo Corredera 

Psychology 
Starling Tyrone Corum 

Physical Education 
Lucinda E. Crawford 

Liberal Arts 
Charlie A. Curlee 

Psychology 
Alfred M. DaCosta 

Counselor Education 



Janice L. Daffern 

Ministerial Studies 
Sharon Dancel 

Social Service 
Ronald Danko 

Biology 
Leonard R. Darnell 

Mathematics 
Victor F. De Jesus 

Biology 







Vincent Del Monte 

Speech 

Communication 
Louis E. Derouchey 

Behavioral Science 
Byron C. Domingo 

Biology 
Robert B. Easterday 

Industrial Studies 
Ronald G. Edgerton 

Management 

Jerrel L. Emery 

Physical Education 
Gideon Evangelista 

Biology 
Donice G. Evans 

Mass Media 
Siltoe T. Faleafine 

Liberal Arts 
Lynanne Felts 

Biology 



Wesley Ferrari 

Anthropology 
Myrna M. Fisher 

Graduate 
Daniel Flores 

Management 
Ralph Flores 

Ministerial Studies 
Angel R. Garrido 

Biology 





Kirsten J. Gaskell 

French 
John S. Gaspar 

Biology 
Andrew D. Gazso 

Health Science 
Conklin Gentry 

Biology 
Celinda Getner 

Social Service 




Linda M. Gilbert 
Counselor Education 

George Grant 

Computer Science 



46 



Edward Graves 

Ministerial Studies 
David A. Greene 

Biology 
Robert R. Guion 

Biology 
Albert H. 

Pre-Public Health 
John S. Haas 

Accounting 





•v 



Christina Hadikusumo 

Management 
Danny Hair 

Chemistry 
Glenn Hakius 

Industrial Studies 
Jon A. Hall 

Physical Education 
Valerie Hallauer 

Secretarial 



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Karen Kamer 

Western Thought 
Valerie Hampton 

Liberal Arts 
Mary Harding 

French 
Carl P. Irby 

Health Science 
William B. Issacs 

Biochemistry 



William B. Issler 

Agriculture 
Satoru Iwai 

Prc-Dietetics 
Kachi Izeogu 

Health Science 
Daryl Jackson 

Health/Phys. Ed. 
Karen Jahnke 

Biology 



Dale James 

Physical Education 
Terence James 

Industrial Studies 
Zoya Javaheri 

Art/ Design 
Paul Jermain 

Biochemistry 
Robin Jester 

Industrial Studies 



. 








W 



Ria Joannou 

Management 
Lila Johiro 

Accounting 
Carolyn Johlman 

Chemistry 
Thomas Jones 

Music 
Kook Jung 

Biology 



Tricia Kaiser 

Behavioral Science 
Kalu A. Kalu 

Biology 





47 



Potchvit Katib 

Management 
Sheila A. Keehnel 

Liberal Arts 
Joann C. Kelsey 

Pre-Med Technology 
Desiree E. Legg 

Church Music 
Shannon L. Leibold 

Graduate 





Janice Letcher 

Writing 
Duncan Leung 

Biology 
Roy Lewis 

French 
Eugene Li 

Sociology 



Thomas Lidner 

Biology 
Carolann Lindegren 

Biology 
Mark Loeffler 

Biology 
Kenneth Lombard 

Religion 
Daniel Lonergan 

Management 

Garry Losey 

Ministerial Studies 
Maria Luna 

Secretarial 
William Mack 

Accounting 
Michael Macomber 

Speech 

Communication 
Hideo Magaki 

English 

David Marsh 

Pre-Physical Therapy 
Sheila Marshall 

Psychology 
Bradford Martin 

Biology 
Gary L. Martin 

Biology 
Olga Martinez 

Art 





48 





Mary Medford 

Liberal Arts 
Michael Mendenhall 

Writing 
Keith Merizan 

Physical Education 
Grant Miller 

Biology 
Guy Miller 

Biology 



Suzanne Miller 

Child Development 
Charlotte Mills 

Biology 
Lisa Minter 

Physical Education 
Richard Mitchell 

Biology 
Cora Moncreif 

Social Service 




Kenneth Nelson 

Psychology 
Paul Nelson 

Biology 
Steve Nelson 

Chemistry 
Yoshikazu Nemoto 

Pre Dentistry 
Bach N. Nguyen 

Biology 



La Vonne Nickel 

German 
Mitsuru Niihara 

Physics 
Lynne Nishikawa 

Speech Pathology 



49 






rrfw 



Jennifer Noble 

Social Service 
Jorge F. Nunuz 

Health Science 
Gloria D. Ochoa 

Nutrition Care 
Dennis Odean 

Management 
Edgar Ojeda 

Health Science 



Carol Oliver 

Social Service 
Joseph Olmos 

Management 
Michael Ooley 

History 
Carl Opsahl 

Management 
Masaharu Osato 

Biology 







Adegboyega Oyesina 

Biology 
Thomas Palermo 

Health Science 
Charlene Palmieri 

Liberal Arts 
Richard Parker 

Biology 
Valerie Parker 

Liberal Arts 



Sylvia Pastor 

Western Thought 
Stephen Pawluk 

Graduate 
Cynthia Pelton 

Physical Education 
Deborah Peterson 

Liberal Arts 
Eric Phang 

Accounting 



Colleen Pierre-Louis 

Graduate 
David Pimental 

Industrial Studies 
Jenny Polk 

Social Service 
Sylvia Pressley 

Health Science 
Cynthia Pride 

Secretarial 






. ! 









John Pritchett 

Speech Pathology 
Ronalda C. Pullens 

Biology 
Rory L. Pullens 

Speech 

Communications 
Reggie Ragsdale 

Management 
James Rapp 

Ministerial Studies 



Patrick Raymore 

Biochemistry 
Terry Reibstein 

Physical Education 



50 






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John Reynolds 

Chemistry 
Brad Richardson 

Admin, of Justice 
Charmaine Ricks 

Home Economics 
Kathleen Rieder 

Child Development 
Riva Robinson 

Ministerial Studies 



Clifford Rodgers 

Computer Science 
Donna Rowe 

Biology 
Elizabeth Salazar 

Graduate 
Janet Samarin 

Anthropology 
Delia M. Santala 

Psychology 






Janelle Smith 

Liberal Arts 
Lillian Smith 

Biology 
Mickey Smith 

Health Science 
Ruth Sherman 

Graduate 
William Shull 

Graduate 




Sherry Shultz 

Liberal Arts 
Deana Sievers 

Home Economics 



51 




Olive Smith 

Accounting 
Karen Snyder 

Home Economics 
Juliette M. SoBrien 

Health Science 
Janet Staubach 

Accounting 
Laurel Ann Steen 

Liberal Arts 




Toni Stephan 

Health/Phys. Ed. 
Craig Story 

Biology 
Florence Stuckey 

Graduate 
Holly Stump 

Visual Arts 
Ronald Sufficool 

Management 



Glenn Sugihara 

Accounting 
Brenda Taylor 

Biology 
Elias Tempe 

Graduate 
Jenny Teoh 

Accounting 
Warren Tetz 

Management 




F.P. Thomas 

Biochemistry 
Jay Thompson 

Psychology 
Kenna Thompson 

Liberal Arts 
Veronica Torres 

Biology 
Wenceslao Torres 

Biology 





Diana Trupp 

Biology 
Candance Turner 

Speech Pathology 
Tadashi Uchiumi 

Biology 
Luz Ulate 

Graduate 
Edgar Urbina 

Biochemistry 





Stan Urquhart 

Health Science 
Gregory Van Doren 

Agriculture 
Rodney Vance 

Ministerial Studies 
Gwenneth Van Putten 

Social Service 
Gloria Vannix 

Psychology 







52 




Julie Wareham 

Biology 
Marshall Wareham 

Music 
Sheryl Watson 

Health Science 
Marcea Weir 

Biology 
Suzan Wertz 

Liberal Arts 




Sherrie Yhip 

Biology 
Henry Yong 

Graduate 
Robert Youssef 

History 




Charlene West 




Med. Illustration 




Samuel West 




Music 




Lee Whitaker 


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Ministerial Studies 




David S. White 


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Mass Media 




Debra White 




Home Economics 


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Ministerial Studies 
Donald M. Wright 

Biology 
William Wright 

Graduate 
Kurds Yaeger 

Physical Education 
Toshiro Yamada 

Biology 



Arwyn Wild 

Liberal Arts 
Durwyn Wild 

Psychology 
Diana Williams 

Health/Phys. Ed 
Israel Williams 

Accounting 
Josiah Wogu 

Secretarial 




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53 




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Huey Davis 

Psychology 

Lori Finstad 
Staff 

Eileen Hartman 
Psychology 



Robert Hoey 
Elementry Ed. 

Harry Hunt 
Religion 

Ted Lang 
Food Service 

Daniel Neira 
Religion 





Evangelina Perez 
Music 

Sharon Teruya 
Psychology 

Kyna Torres 

Physical Therapy 








Robyn Anderson 
Vincent Anyakora 
Vilma Apostal 
Doris Ann Arthur 





Joanie Bischoff 
Diane Bishop 
Sam Bolivar 
Kurt Bower 




Janie Chaname-Cavani 
Cindy Crawford 
Charles Curlee 
Sharon Dancel 



Shondah Donato 
Donnice Evans 
Lynanne Felts 
Colleen Frisby 







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Conklin Gentry 
Rick Griggs 
Sheilah Henderson 
Fred Hernandez 






Carol Hinchman 
Lanny Hochhalter 
William Hoxie 
Cindy Hoffman 






Karen Jahnke 
Paul Jermain 
Wilson Lao 
Julie Lazo 






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Michelle Lee 
Dieter Leipf 
Shelia Marshall 
Gigi Maurer 





Juvenilda Muniz 
Donna Myers 
Gloria Ochoa 
Liz Ordonez 



56 





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Tom Palermo 
Colleen Rosanne Pierre- 
Louis 



Lynn Sapienzae 
Nancy Saul 




Deana Sievers 
David Stanton 
Craig Story 
Lee Whitaker 



Josiah Wogu 
Melanie Wuchnich 




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Henry Yong 
Mary Zurek 







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60 




JUNIORS 










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Sandra Adams 
James Akamine 
Edmund Akioka 
Edgar Aleman 
Nancy Allen 
Brian Allinder 



Joan Andersen 
Vincent Anyakora 
Christine Arneaud 
Ben Asare 
Harold Avila 
Gerard Ban 



George 

Bazemore III 
Michael Beaumont 
Cindy Beck 
Judith Bedney 
Jeff Bell 
Marjan Bentley 



Beverly Bishop 
Doug Bishop 
Randy Bishop 
Gregory Blash 
Robert Boram 
Janice Border 



Mary Bowers 
James Boyd 
James Braun 
Mary Braunstein 
Luz Brinckhaus 
Alex Britton 



Kelvin Brummett 
John Buchholz 
Phillip Burke 
Lori Busby 
Randolph Cadiente 
Jeannie Canson 



Lester Carney 
Richard Carrigan 
Carlos Carrio 
Robert Carter 
Robin Cash 
Victor Castellanos 



Nina Ceballos 
Elizabeth Chadwick 
Dina Chairez 
Marcia Chalmers 
Jeff Chambers 
King-Pam Chong 




62 



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Berit Christensen 
Ronald Christian 
Llewellyn 

Christopher 
Ron Cummings 
Sandra Cunningham 
Sheri Cloninger 



Clay Cole 
John Coleman 
Victor Colon 
Sandra Comazzi 
Matthew Cruz 
Gloriana Chung 



Rona Chung 
Rocio Cisneros 
Jewel Clark 
Debbie Comm 
Brent Cox 
Christopher Coy 



Ronald Crandall 
Paul Crane 
Daryl Crouch 
Patricia Danforth 
Shondah Donato 
Dean Doty 



Richard Douglass 
Martha Durham 
Julie Espana 
Christopher 
Espinosa 
Emmett Evans 
Roberta Evans 



Sandra Fargo 
June Ferguson 
Melissa Fisher 
Suzanne Flores 
Latina Freeman 
Raymond French 



Kent Fry 
Jill Gainer 
Susan Gathings 
Elmer Geli 
John Goddard 




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Angela Gordon 
Kevin Gray 
Sue Gregerson 
Estelle Greive 
Dane Griffin 
Reggie Griggs 



Steven Grindley 
Frank Griswold 
Jairo Gutierrez 
John Guynn 
Charles Guzman 
Paul Hadden 



Kurnadi 

Hadikusumo 
Lia Hadjiyianni 
Steve Hadley 
Linda Hall 
Lorraine Hall 
Renee Harder 



Diane Harris 
Laura Hastings 
Benny Hernandez 
Leif Hertzog 
Laura Hetterle 
Shirle Hirayama 



Cheryl Hockin 
Randall Hoff 
Keith Hoffmann 
Richard Hogg 
Keith Horinouchi 
Katherine Horrigan 



Paul Howell 
William Hoxie 
Corinne Hoyt 
Gustavo Huerta 
Patricia Hunter 
Crystal Huskey 



On Huynh 
Myung Hwang 
Craig Inouye 
Daryl Jacques 
Pamel-Marrie 

Jamel 
Francesca Johnson 





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Juanita Johnson 
Jeffrey Jones 
Marta Kalbermatter 



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64 




Nathan Kam 
Dennis Kamilos 
Reem Katrib 
Marietta Keene 
Kevin Kibble 
Dongsun Kim 



Richard Kim 
Renee Klause 
John Klim 
Hale Kuhlman 
Alan Lawson 
Jerry Lee 



Joni Leipf 
James Lemasters 
Carmela Leonora 
Randall Lewis 
Kathryn Lopez 
Jose Loredo 



Lucy Lorenzo 
Steve Losey 
Marilynn Loveless 
Daryl Luthas 
Carlos Macias 
Lenore Magsulit 





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Karen Mainess 






Reynaldo Matute 


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Lois McGhee 


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Gilberto Melendez 






Steve Mercill 






Merri Mickelson 




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Kenny Miklos 
Craig Miller 
Pam Mills 
Jirair Minassian 
Lumarie Moreno 
Peter Morgan 



Patricia Mroczek 
David Munar 
Lindy Murphy 
Peggy Muths 
Hiromasa Nagai 
Ivan Namihas 





65 







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Karen Winston 
Vernon Yamashiro 
James Zackrison 
Julie-Ann Zerne 







68 





Gary Baker 
Cathy Berry 
Sandra Blackman 
Brian Bovey 



Franklin Broomfield 
Laurel Buttler 
Greg Cabrera 
Jeff Christian 



Rocio Cisneros 
Steve Clegg 
Ronald Crandall 
Karen Daugherty 




Margie Grounds 
Lupe Gutierrez 
Marie Hand 
Keith Horinouchi 




Butch Rudolph 

Dimery 
Russell Dovnies 
Norman Fadel 
Mowatt Francisco 



69 



Yen Kim 

Roberta Lammers 
Mark La Rosse 
Cliff Lesinsky 








Edith Linares 
Miguel Lopez 
Jose Loredo 
Adele Lorenz 







Tom Mayer 
Thad Mosely 
Ezra Oliverio 
Jerald Pritchett 









Gina Raffoni 
Thomas Richardson 
Kathy Rieder 
Dexter Shurney 





Sherryl Skoeretz 
Virginia Strehle 
Irma Torres 
Sidney Torres 



70 





Sylvia Urbina 
Sylvia Villa 
Doreen Weller 





Liz Wilson 
Angie Winter 
Doug Wisdom 





71 







72 





SOPHOMORES 




Johnny Abidin 
Debra Adkins 
Sonia Anchieta 
Clinton Anderson 
Van Anderson 



Poay Ang 
Abraham Armijo 
Sylvia Arradaza 
Donald Ashcraft 
Gayle Ashley 
Melody Bailey 



Tommie Baines 
Glen Baker 
Keith Baldwin 
Mary Barlow 
Suzann Bassham 
Mike Bauer 



Brian Bedney 
Bonnie Bender 
Yolanda Bendrell 
Kathy Berry 
Arlene Birdsall 
Brenda Blaine 



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Cheryl Blue 
Deborah Bobst 
James Borg 
James Boram 
Lisa Botnick 
Willie Bouie 



Brian Bovey 
Kay Bowers 
Eddie Braga 
Lawrence Brammer 
Cindy Brandt 
Brenda Brockman 



Angela Cabellon 
Leo Cabus 
Wilner Cacno 
Rogie Cadiente 



74 




John Camoron 
Julieta Cano 
Eugene Carbajal 
Rick Carr 
Steven Carr 
Nancy Carson 



Miguel Castillo 
Darrell Causey 
Kevin Channer 
Monica Chavez 
Yvette Chavez 
George Chebib 



Diane Childs 
Jeff Chinn 
Christian 

Christensen 
Gary Christensen 
Jeff Christian 
Michael Chucta 



Rowena Chung 
Thomas Clark 
Larry Clonch 
Sysie Cloninger 
Darlene Collins 
Jon Collins 



Mary Coneff 
Valarie Cook 
Steven Coppi 
Cindy Cottrell 
Ned Coyl 
Grace Crawford 



John Cummings 
Slavica Cvetkovic 
Mary Dalzell 
Alphonso Dassie 
Spring Dassie 
Karen Daugherty 



Byron Davis 
Huey Davis 
Gary De La O 
Jon Decker 
John Delinger 
David Dennis 




75 




Perin Dharmakumar 






Kevin Dickinson 




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Judy Dideriksen 






Rudolph Butch 






Dimery 
Robin Domino 






Janice Dorton 


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Mary Dorton 
Gary Douglas 
Dennis Dowswell 
Rolf Drinhaus 
Janeen Duff 
Steve Duong 



John Durney 
Jyll Edwards 
Janelle Emery 
Jay Emery 
Mark Enomoto 
Kim Ersery 



Ruben Escalante 
Mauricio Espinosa 
Jemima Etpison 
Penny Evans 
Jana Everidge 
Robert Evers 



Norman Fadel 
Dallas Fandrich 
Sue Ferguson 
Clay Finlay 
Eddie Flores 
Maria Flores 



Craig Forss 
Margaret Foster 
Holly Fredricksen 
Howard French 
Conrad Frey 
Kevin Fujikawa 



Susie Fuss 
Gregg Gallemore 
Joseph Garcia 
Maysie Gerona 
Richard Gilbert 
Siew Goh 




Allen Goodall 
Gerard Gorski 
Vicky Griswold 



76 




Marjorie Grounds 
Catherine Grubb 
Anthony Gutierrez 
Lupe Gutierrez 
Cheryl Habekost 
Eddie Haddad 



Jacklin Haddad 
Sondra Hadley 
Dexter Hansen 
Mark Harriman 
Leonard Harris 
Ronald Harrison 



Cindy Harvey 
Christine Hatton 
Jerrine Hawkins 
Lori Hawkins 
Geoffrey Hayton 
Bob Henneman 



Brett Herrick 
Sondra Hill 
Shannon Hillman 
Terry Hillock 
Yueh Ho 
Susie Hocker 



Victoria Hodgen 
Teresa Hollar 
Key Hong 
Daniel Hooper 
Robin Houghton 
George Howard 



Kenneth Howard 
Robert Hubbard 
Joleen Ingham 
Somkid Intaphan 
Jeri Iverson 
Frank Jackson 



Wesley Jackson 
Wilnor Jaurique 
Andrea Jenkins 
David Johnson 
Karlene Johnson 
Ronald Johnson 



Karen Johnston 
Barbara Jones 
Louis Kannenberg 
Jil Kauffman 




77 













Stewart Kawamura 
Kathy Kersey 
Michael Kimbrough 
Marcia Kime 
Shelley Kinzer 
David Kissinger 



Ed Knight 
James Knight 
Greg Knutzen 
Toru Kobayashi 
Alvin Konschuh 
David Koos 



Betty Kose 
Lora Lambeth 
Claudette Lanneauz 
Ruel Lao 
Jack Larson 
Azalea Lazo 



Huyen Le 
Thuy-Nga Le 
Leroy Leggitt 
Andrea Leonora 
Shelley Lewis 
Ivan Lezcano 



Jayson Lidar 
Cindy Loder 
Michael Loeffler 
Tammy Long 
Alan Longshore 
Annette Lopez 



Miguel Lopez 
Paul Lopez 
Sam Loredo 
Jon Loriezo 
Rhonda Lynch 
Sue Lyon 



Cindy Magsulit 
Debbie Manteuffel 
Ed Markle 
Debi Marsh 
George Martinet 
Linda Mascari 




Paul Mathis 
Seiji Matsumoto 
Linda Mayer 



78 




Mary McDuffie 
Shevy Floyd 
McGregor 
Nyron McLean 
Starleen Meyer 
Patty Miller 
Sarah Miller 



Tamra Miller 
Cheryl Mills 
Annette Molina 
Greg Monette 
Jeanine Moor 
John Moore 



Gretchen Morphis 
Jose Muinos 
Odette 

Munyandamutsz 
Victoria Murrain 
Nelson Musgrave 
Bret Namihas 



Adriana Navas 
Jana Nielsen 
Keith Nelson 
Martin Nelson 
Heinz Niemann 
Rodney Noble 



Ann Obata 
Joseph Oliver 
Esdras Oliver 
Harry Olson 
Julie Omar 
Edith Ordonez 



Bryan Oshiro 
Russell Ottley 
Stephen Packwood 
Ann Louise Palm 
Michael Parker 
David Parrett 



Michael Parrett 
Brenda Pascal 
Clifton Patten 
Jeri Lynn Patton 
Lorrilee Paulauskis 
Michele Pefferly 








Elena Peralta 
Jeanne Pervorse 
Herman Peterson 



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Leslie Peterson 
Edmund Petti 
Maria Petti 
Beverly Phelps 
Andetta Phillips 
Denice Phillips 



Judy Pierce 
Ruby Pilar 
Shellie Piper 
Cristine Platas 
Shirley Plummer 
Jan Pontynen 



April Pope 
Wendall Poulsen 
Rhonda Pressley 
Merry Pritchette 
Ramon Pulido 
Will Pullen 



Yvonne Purdy 
Joong Pyo 
Eldaa Quiles 
Gina Raffoni 
John Rambharose 
Ronald Rasmussen 



Martha Rave 
David Reagan 
Randy Reddig 
Virginia Reiber 
Terence Reinig 
Halcyon Rhodes 



Robert Richardson 
Robin Roaney 
Myra Roberts 
Christy Robinson 
James Robinson 
Efren Rodriguez 



Lori Rollins 
Michael Ross 
Mark Royer 
Timothy Ruffner 
George Rugless 
Michael Rumbaugh 



Dale Rutherford 
Yoko Saeki 
Yvonne Sahagun 
Ronald Sanders 
Marion Sanker 




80 




Dana Sawwan 
Randa Sawwan 
Pierre Scales 
Janet Schall 
Linda Schneider 
Arturo Segura 



Reinhard Sendow 
Ellen Seronko 
Kwang Shin 
Greg Shotwell 
Dexter Shurney 
Marie Siegel 



Estrellita 

Simpliciano 
Shirley Sing 
Genevieve Sitompul 
Randall Skoretz 
Sherylle Skoretz 
Janci Slayback 



Donald Slusarenko 
Anthony Smith 
Kevin Smith 
Stephanie Smith 
Melinda Snider 
Deborah Sotelo 



Jeri Souw 
Richard Spencer 
Linual Spicer 
Cheryl Splawn 
Linda Steen 
Christine Stern 



Daniel Stevens 
Barbara Stewart 
Chris Stottlemyer 
Craig Stottlemyer 
Barbara Stough 
Janet Strachan 



Brandon Strahan 
Virginia Strehle 
John Strickland 
Elizabeth Stutler 
Yudi Sugiono 
Alice Sulindro 




Marcella Sulindro 
Noriko Suzuki 
Albert Swarez 
Mary Switzer 




81 



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82 



Rosanna Wilson 
Samuel Wilson 
August Winner 
Lanny Wiono 
Douglas Wisdom 
Dell Wonderly 






Kathleen Yhip 
Gale Young 
Linda Gail Young 
Melanie Young 
Susan Young 



Edmund Wong 
Sandra Woods 
Byron Wright 
Shellee Wright 
Scott Wyman 
Elaine Wynne 



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Michael Parker 
Audry Partridge 
Shellie Piper 
Alita Potter 




Mark Ashlock 
Kim Damazo 
Clay Finley 
Eileen Frisby 



Barbara Fortman 
Ron Harrison 
George Howard 
Pat Nixon 




Mary Richards 
Rhonda Robinson 
Collette Smith 
James Simulat 



Paula Teams 
Judy VanArsdale 
Leandria Williams 
Nercedes Williams 







84 




Benny Abidin 
Linda Abbey 
Humberto Acuna 
Margaret Aki 
Esther Alonso 
Dolly Alsaybar 





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Jeannette Alvarez 
Cheryl Anderson 
Monica Arnold 
Luz Arradaza 
Michael Arroyo 
Lillian Austin 



Kenny Avila 
Jon Backy 
Bonnie Baer 
Rikard Bailey 
Lisa Baldwin 
Gary Banta 




Becky Bartos 
Patricia Bauer 
Ruben Bazan 
G. David R. Bedney 
Lowell Beebe 
Bobbi Belko 



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Ronald Bell 
Timothy Bell 
Debbie Bella 
Sylvia Berthelsen 
Julie Bertrand 
Julie Billard 



John Blaine 
Keith Blankenship 
Teresa Blankenship 
Melanie Blicha 
Phyllis Boyd 
Michael Bravo 



Randall Brower 
Katrina Buchholz 
Sharon Buckwalter 
Jeannie Burch 
Neilton Burgo 











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86 



Lily Burquez 
Nannette Burris 
Paul Cahn 
Lisette Carlito 
Marc Carpenter 
Lucidalia Carrera 




Lisa Catalano 
Denise Cates 
Cesar Cerna 
Dawn Chafin 
Linnea Champion 
Gordon Chan 



Fred Chang 
Cherrie Channer 
Martyn Charron 
Russell Chavrier 
Marisel Chibas 
Sandy Ching 





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Tai Cho 
John Choi 
David Christenson 
Annie Chu 
Lori Ciccarelli 
John Clem 




Jennifer Cotton 
Barbara Craig 
Janelle Dalson 
Lisa Dalzell 
Debbie Daugherty 
Jodi Davies 



Lin Day 
Gary Deacon 




Louis Carroll 
Elizabeth Carson 
Dawn Carty 
Donald Case 
Debbie Castellucci 
Suzette Catalon 




Charles Cole 
Kimberly Collier 
Kirk Collins 
Cheryl Cooke 
Robin Cooney 
Gloria Corona 





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Donald Erickson 
Brenda Evans 
Shellee Eyer 
Marven Fernando 
Charles Ferrari 
Lori Field 




Cheryl Germany 
Alita Gholston 
Robert Golles 
Nancy Gonzales 



Debbie DeBooy 
Terri DeCarlo 
Stacey Deem 
Zaida Delgado 
Scott Dennis 
Brian Dobalian 




Rose Duarte 

Edwin Dysinger 
Barry Edminster 
Suzanne Edson 
Laureli Erick 
Melisa Erick 



1 













Calvin Fisher 
Tana Fisher 
Rosey Flores 
Geraldine Foster 
Patricia Foster 
Brenda Frederick 




Arnulfo Gallo 
Patrick Garcia 
Cheryl Gard 
Edna Garza 
Michelle Gebeau 
Valerie Gebeau 






Greg Dobalian 
Kevin Dobalian 
Max Dookeran 
Otis Dorton 
Kimberly Downs 
Cecilia Duarte 











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Jo Ann Frederico 
Shellie Friend 
Barbara Funk 
Carol Furr 
Julie Fuschetti 
Todd Gallemore 







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Daralyn Goo 
Kay Gooding 
Henk Goorhuis 
Sandy Gorton 
Virginia Goude 
Jeanne Greenman 



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Michelle Grigsby 
Mary Griswold 
Joanne Gross 
Rickey Grubbs 
John Gulley 
Linda Guy 





Richard Guy 
Ria Guzman 
Raja Haddad 
Teri Haines 
Elaine Hamilton 
Hingkie Han 




Lori Hashimoto 
Mari Hayashi 
Timothy Heilman 
Keith Heldreth 
Don Henricksen 
Linda Henry 



Magdalena 


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Cherrie Herrick 


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Ron Hetterle 


Ronald Hill 


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Richard Hilleman 


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Kathleen Hilliard 
Kirk Hirata 
Elisabeth Hoag 
Cynthia Hoehn 
Laura Hohenberger 
Eva Holman 






Joseph Hancock 
Thomas Harder 
Candy Hardesty 
Carol Harding 
Ronald Harris 
Fern Harrison 






Roderick Holness 
Tammy Homer 
Regina Hooks 
Tami Howard 
Kim Huft 














5- 




90 




Bien Lath 
Akmal Lawrence 
Frexiny Lazo 
Alice Lee 
Bohyung Lee 
Brent Lee 



George Lee 
Ji Lee 
Karen Lee 
Michelle Lee 
Stella Leong 
Kathy Lewis 





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Nancy Lewis 
Francis Li 
Theresa Lilley 
Geri Lilly 
Catherina Lim 
Hender Linares 






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Frances Lucas 
Ralph Lucas 
Michael Lum 
Lorna Mabley 
Debbie Macdonald 
Tom Macomber 




Lori Lind 
Richard Lindley 
Sylvia Lindsay 
Michelle Lockert 
Abel Loredo 
Adelle Lorenz 





Sanaa Malaku 
Judy Marcello 
Grace Martin 
Milan Martinov 
William Martinson 
Esther Masters 







Michelle Matar 
Debra Matsuda 
Chieko Matsumoto 
Wesley McCart 
Joya McCary 
John McGilchrist 








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Tammy McGuire 
Michael Meeks 



91 









Noble Merriett 
Michelle Michaels 
Abdullah Migrin 
Fay Miller 
Gregory Mitchell 
Mamie Mitchell 




Mark Mobley 
Delbert Mock 
Holly Moler 
Debra Mondragon 
David Moor 
Lourdes Moreno 





Luis Moreno 
Winston Morgan 
LeAnne Moss 
Luis Mota De Sousa 
Gail Murphy 
Kathleen Nakagawa 





Bruce Nelson 
David Nelson 
True Nguyen 
Erika Niemann 
Vicki Niswonger 
Glen Noble 




Evelyn Nwaomah 
Tammy Ogle 
Karen Oi 
Ralph Oliverio 
Maria Osborne 
David Otis 






Carol Owen 
Suzette Owens 
Heidie Paredes 
Tami Parfitt 
Toni Pari 
Dana Parker 




Debbie Parker 
Janet Paul 
Rachel Pavlich 
Gregory Peck 
Ronald Pennington 
Teresa Perez 







Jean Pester 
Joy Pevytoe 
Hoa Pham 
Yen Pham 




92 





Barbara Scott 



93 








Larry Scott 
Andrina Seay 
Luz Segura 
David Semones 
Frederic Settle 
Sonja Sewell 



Toni Shannon 
Mildred Shelton 
Sherri Sheperd 
Joni Sheppard 
Woo Shin 
Houda Shinnawi 



Walid Shinnawi 
Chuck Shull 
Ara Simms 
Minerva Sitompul 
Jamie Skare 
Karen Skyberg 



Lani Slack 
Lyla Smith 
Michael Smith 
Ronald Smith 
Stanley Smith 
Tabo Smith 



Yvon Smith 
Danny Soliz 
Kerrie Spezman 
Alton Spurgeon 
Sidney Stafford 
Jeffrey Stallworth 



Judy Strutz 
Jeff Stephan 
Steve Sun 
Vio Taeleifi 
Gail Takaki 
Magdalene Tan 



Sandra Tavares 
Allison Taylor 
Ross Tempelton 
Tom Teske 
Renee Thomas 
Kevin Thompson 



Duane Thorpe 
Vel-Amor Tigno 
Alison Titmarsh 
Archie Tonge 
Sama Tooma 
Ashi Torabinejad 






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94 




Woody Totton 
Gary Tsao 
Shirley Tseng 
Kelly Turner 
Teresa Umali 
Linda Uruma 



Adolpho Valdez 
James Valdez 
Shelly Van Cleef 
Dennis Van Fossen 
Rory Van Orden 
Dougals Van Putten 



Robin Vance 




Sarita Vargas 


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Jose Vega 




Samuel Vidaurreta 




Rick Villa 


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Christina Villaba 


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Danny Villanueva 
Kevin Villaverde 
Cynthia Voight 
Khanh Vu 
Darryllyn Walker 
L,ouverture Walker 



Melody Elizabeth 
Wall 

Patricia Wareham 
Stephen Wareham 
Gail Watts 
Myrna Webster 
John Wendling 



Kathy Wheat 
Kathryn Whelchel 
Nicholas White 
Teresa Wilkerson 
Barbara Wilkin 
Bruce Williams 



Valerie Williams 
David Wisdom 
Karla Wister 
Evie Wittlake 
Perry Wortham 
Tetsuo Yamamoto 









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Virginia Yazzie 
Sherman Yu 
David Zackrison 



95 







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Debbie Adkins 
Reggie Adkins 
Becky Bartos 
Arlene Birdsall 





Kevin Blankenship 
Dawn Chafin 
Byron Cisneros 
Sandra Chin 









Russ Cyphers 
Dorothy de la Cruz 
Jodi Davies 
Kevin Dovalian 






Vicki Hill 
Vicky Hodgen 
Dan Robert Hutton 
Patti IbArra 



Gene Eddelman 
Jay Ernest Lidar 
Frantz Garcon 
Jeanne Greenman 






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Wilnor Jaurique 
Belinda Lara 
Geri Lilly 
Michael Lum 



Debbie Marsh 
Linda Mayer 
David Moor 
Kelly O'Brien 




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CAMPUS 
LIFE 






98 




99 






BARN PARTY 

BEGINS ACTIVE YEAR 

Sunday, September 25th, was the date 
of the popular Barn Party. The Party 
was the first of the ASLLU social activ- 
ities of the year. 

Orginated by Abel Whittemore with 
help from Sandy Arct, Freshman Orien- 
tation Director, the party was designed 
to get freshmen and returning students 
to mix, mingle, and meet others in a 
pleasant atmosphere. 

The exciting evening began with the 
hayrides sponsored by Whittemore and 
the Department of Agriculture. The 
rides began at the Agriculture building 
and terminated at the farm area near the 
old college barn. 

As students arrived they were greeted 
by Bob Grant and Jeri Souw. Apple 
Cider and loads of Winchells doughnuts 
quickly made the rounds as students got 
to know each other. 

After games, the group settled down 
to the serious music of Joe Savino and 
Company. Though very familiar to LLU 
audiences, Joe once again proved he 
could make a whole new lot of fans with 
his easy country/western music. 

It was a good start for ASLLU. 
Though time would show that not all 
activities would be as well planned or 
attended, it still set the stage for a year 
that would bring challenges and solu- 
tions, defeats and victories to the ASLLU 
social activity program. 






100 






FALL ROUND-UP 1977 

The Fall Round-up began at 8:30 p.m. on 
the evening of October 1st. 

Organized by Daniel Montero, ASLLL 
Social Activities Director, the event saw a 
bit of the western lifestyle come to the 
campus for an evening. 

Games which brought the students to- 
gether were popular that night. Hot Choco- 
late and mountains of cookies made the 
evening enjoyable. 

After the rodeo which featured students 
and faculty, the group turned its attention 
to the music of Joe Savino and Company 
(again). 

Afterwards there was milk and punch and 
leftover cookies for everyone. 

Though people compared this compara- 
tively low keyed activity to the immensely 
popular Barn party of the week before, 
most students thought it was a particularly 
nice way to spend an evening at LLU, 
especially since nothing else was going on 
— anywhere! 





101 



REGISTRATION MADE 
EASIER THE 
KUTZNFR WAY! 

This years registration procedures were 
the smoothest ever held at La Sierra due to 
the overall coordination of Registrar Arno 
Kutzner. 

Kutzner ran the tightest registration pro- 
cedure ever as he saw to it that people ar- 
rived at the Pavillion in an orderly way. 

To help the newly arrived freshman class 
a dedicated team of students led by Mrs. 
Iris Landa, circulated through the Pavillion 
assisting the new students. 

The Chaplain was there of course with 
his famous "Gabriel" punch to quench the 
thirst of many an advisor as well as advisee. 

As many returning students who in the 
past had slid into the Pavillion found; this 
year was the year of the fair turn. 

Overall coordination of the day was pro- 
vided by Mr. Kutzner and Mrs. Landa. 
They deserve the praise for finally making 
registration a livable process. 




102 




CAMPUS DAY STUDENTS 
WENT EVERYWHERE 
BUT THE CAMPUS . . 

This years Campus Day seemed more like 
an ad for Geritol than the takeoff on the Star 
Wars craze it was supposed to be. 

What made October 12 such a failure? May- 
be it was the lack of support from the faculty 
and administration which had so long voiced 
opposition to having a day in which students 
could relax from classes and labs. 

Perhaps it was the obvious improper plan- 
ning that killed the program. 

The fact was, the reason Campus Day died 
this year was due to lack of support from all of 
us. 

There were planned activities. There were 
people who had organized the day who waited 
for crowds of students that were never to show 
up. 

Many students felt that just because they 
had a free day they shouldn't be forced to at- 
tend a pre-planned day. Many chose instead to 
go to the beach for one last day of sun and surf 
before the winter. Other stayed in their rooms 
and caught some precious hours of rest and 
study for their first tests of the year. 

For those that did participate, it was an easy 
going day topped off in the evening by Film 
Society's presentation of "55 Days at Peking" 




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103 



WEEK OF PRAYER: 

A TIME OF REFLECTION 

AND RENEWAL 

For some students this year's weeks of prayer were 
just another example of an institution which almost 
forces it's religion on others by creation of the captive 
audience. 

For others it was a sharing and creating experience. 
One week that brought life into focus. It became a 
week of introspection and reflection. A week of reval- 
uation and renewal of goals. 

Fall week of Prayer was presented by Dr. Benjain 
Reeves of Andrews University and dealt with the 
theme of truth, and freedom. Dr. Reeves challenged 
students and administrators to come in closer contact 
with a caring God who desperately wants our love and 
respect. 

During the week groups formed over the campus 
which met during first quarter to nurture and help and 
encourage each other. 

Spring Week of Prayer saw the return of a beloved 
former teacher in the Div. of Religion. Smuts Van 
Rooyen noted SDA theologian presented one of the 
most challenging series in recent history. 

Even though students really missed the student led 
week of prayers of former years, objections were for- 
gotten as students and administrators were united day 
after day and night after night in the unique presenta- 
tion of Dr. Van Rooyen. 

Van Rooyen stressed the importance of simple 
abiding faith in a loving and accepting God. He con- 
centrated on the unique gifts of the spirit, as a saving 
factor in the Christian life. 

Some students ditched, others got work excuses, 
most benefited and caught a glimpse of God's redemp- 
tive love. 




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104 



FACULTY HOME VESPERS: 

A welcome change of pace 

Faculty Home vespers this year were known for 
the unique programming they provided as an alter- 
native to the usual Friday Night vesper programs. 

The First one was held Friday night November 
4th at 7:30 p.m. 

Students met at the mailbox in front of the school 
and were transported to different faculty members 
homes for an evening of sharing and worship. 

Many students were eager to see what the faculty 
members really lived like! 

At the Landa's residence, students marveled at 
the many world artifacts that Iris and Paul have 
collected in their travels. Paul presented slides of his 
recent trip to Australia. One student marveled that 
"Landa is amazingly the same man in and out of 
the lecture room." Another student remarked, 
"This guy was so far out he even gave us a biblio- 
graphy, just like in class!" 

At the Mitchells', students were treated to a deli- 
cious meal and a presentation by student mission- 
arys. Mrs. Mitchells was the perfect hostess and 
proved she could tell a story just as well as her 
learned husband. (Some say even better!) 

They were pleasent evenings as students discov- 
ered that the same strict teachers were human beings 
who love to share and enjoy their work and life- 
style. Faculty Home vespers served to bring the 
University closer together as a family. And thats 
what made them very popular throughout the year. 







105 



DISNEYLAND 
PARTY 

On Sunday, October 23rd, 1977 
LLU spent the evening at Disney- 
land, the "happiest place on earth." 
Starting at about 3:00 that afternoon, 
a procession of cars bearing LLU 
stickers could be seen heading east- 
ward on 91 freeway to Anaheim and 
to the Magic Kingdom. 

When the gates opened at 4:00 the 
first place everyone headed for was of 
course the brand new thrill ride: 
Space Mountain! No other ride at the 
park that night was as much fun or 
had as many repeaters as the 5 minute 
spin through the universe. 

Of course there were the other 
usual rides that weren't to be missed. 
Pirates of the Caribbean and the 
Haunted Mansion provided thrills 
and chills of their own. For audience 
entertainment, the Country Bear 
Jamboree presented a concert that 
even pleased the most discriminating 
music majors. 

For some it was a momentous 
evening because of the company. 
Many of the freshmen chose the 
University party at Disneyland for 
their very first college date. For many 
of us old timers it was a final chance 
to relax before a grueling mid-terms 
week. 

The evening passed ever so quickly 
and before you could say "Fantasy- 
land" it was 12 mid-nite. The cars 
with the little stickers from LLU 
slowly made their way back to cam- 
pus. They left behind a magical world 
of talking birds, space capsules for 
two, dancing bears, dancing people, 
giant water molucules and of course, 
the one and only Mickey Mouse! 

A calm ride home, a nice good 
night kiss, and a relaxed, restful sleep 
capped off one of the years truly 
enjoyable Sunday nights. 





106 









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FASHION 
SHOW 






108 



THE HAUNTED NIGHT 








109 



POLYNESIAN 
LUAU 








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RELIGION RETREAT 

A RENEWAL OF PURPOSE 



A DIVISIONAL RETREAT 

The Division of Religion retreai was held 
this year at Pine Springs Ranch in Idyllwild. 

This years main speaker was Morris 
Venden who reflected the churches growing 
concern with the issue of rigtheousness by 
faith by presenting his talks on the subject 
of being saved. 

Venden's excellent series provided a 
timely backdrop for the whole weekend in 
which religion theology majors reflected on 
the need to be prepared for assuming minis- 
terial roles in the church and community. 

Some of the highlights of the weekend 
included the Friday night song service led 
by Charles Teel; the Sabbath School which 
broke into discussion groups which con- 
fronted challenges to contemporary adven- 
tisim such as homosexuality. It was Yvonne 
Mason's stunning violin solo Sabbath 
morning which left the audience amazed, 
humbled and reverent. 

The weekend climaxed with the agape 
love feast and communion. The religion 
majors and staff returned down the hill with 
a clear sense of pride, purpose, and goals. 





112 



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FELLOWSHIP, 

SHARING AND NURTURE, 

AND MORRIS VENDEN TOO! 





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FESTIVAL OF NATIONS 








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115 



CHRISTMAS BANQUET 
A PRESENT FROM ASLLU 



The Christmas Banquet this year was held at the 
beautiful Airporter Inn in Newport Beac., on Decem- 
ber 4, 1 977 as 7:30 P.M. It was the nicest present ASLLU 
could have provided. The atmosphere was flawless, 
the food was better than past years and the program 
was excellent. 

"Frizzy" an accomplished juggler performed feats 
of unnerving skill before an enraptured audience. He 
also had the world's longest handkerchief come out of 
his mouth, as well as juggling up to ten objects at once. 
What kept the audience laughing, however, was his 
hysterical facial expressions. He amazed the audience 
with his violin concert, playing everything from Led 
Zepplin's Stairway to Heaven to a rendition of the 
William Tell Overture, known locally as the Randy 
Bishop Theme Song. 

The music was provided by a group of PUC students 
flown in for the occasion by Danny Montero, ASLLU 
Social Activities Director. Ritchie Carbajal flawlessly 
performed several renditions on the piano to set the 
mood of the event. Don Cichetti was great as the 
sound man. 

Congratulations to Danny Montero for an excellent 
job in planning one of the year's best activities. 






116 












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118 





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ANYTHING 

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CAMPUS MINISTRIES 

A RETREAT 

TO REMEMBER . . . 





122 






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RETREAT: 
LLU CLOSER 
TO GOD 










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125 



"BETWEEN THE LINES" 
NEW TRIUMPH FOR ASLLU 
STUDENT CENTER PROGRAM 



March 5th, 1978 saw the debut of one of 
the newest programs at the New ASLLU 
Student Center. "Between the Lines" prom- 
ised to be the classiest assortment of 
campus talent ever assembled for an evining 
program. 

As the audience filtered in around 
8:00 p.m. that evening, few realized the 
special event it would become. Invitations 
were sent to 100 faculty and 200 selected 
students. The master of ceremonies was 
Elmer Geli. 

The first performance was an audience 
stunner as alumnus Larry Richardson 
presented "Casey at the Bat" Richardson 
achieved an ovation and was admitedly 
the evening's most popular act. Then 
neophyte Lewis Rodgers teaming up with 
the remarkably talented Carol Harding did 
a set of 5 songs composed by Rodgers and 
Elmer Geli. The songs were a sensation and 
were one of the most creative presentations 
that evening. 

Intermission was coordinated by Cyn- 
thia Larkin. During the Secibdactm Elmer, 
ever the empressario thanked his staff, 
Jim Robison, Jodi Davies, Bruce Kim, and 
Marjan Bentley for all their loyalty and 
support. 

Larry Richardson again delighted the 
audience with "Casey, 20 years later." 
Richardson held the audience in his palm 
as he wove the tale that enraptured the 
whole room. 

What would an ASLLU event be without 
the ever present music of Joe Savino? 
That night Joe played new material like 
"I can't Smile Without You" and "Love 
Song for Julie" which he wrote for his 
fiancee, Julie Switzer. Savino was joined 
by Switzer and well known banjo player 
Steve Schultz. After Savino's set, Elmer 
Geli led the audience in a final thunderous 
round of applause for all the performers. 

Suzette Catalon then read the winners 
of the door prizes and was shocked when 
two of the five prizes went to her boy- 
friend, Jim Robison, and her brother, 
Samuel Catalon. 

People loved the evening and many 
wished that ASLLU would provide this 
type of programming on a more regular 
basis. "Between the Lines" was an indica- 
tion of what is possible with a little hope 
and creativity and a lot of perspiration. It 
was just another of many activities this 
year that dramatically focused attention of 
the University on the development of the 
new student center. 





The original music of Lewis Rodgers and Elmer Geli featured Carol Harding as the female vo- 
calist. Response was fantastic! 




While Joe Savino and Julie Switzer entertained, Cynthia Larkin led the crew of Between the 

Lines hostesses. 

Bruce Kim and Jodi Davies were honored Student Center employees. 



126 





MICHEAL HENESSY 
A HIT AT LLU 

Saturday night at 8:30, Michael Hen- 
nessy, assisted by his musicians Dan Ble- 
gen and Eric Sayer, gave a two part mime 
presentation to 256 entertainment-starved 
students. Each act, from his beginning with 
the Trained Flea to his final juggling act, 
was consistantly excellent and the tempo 
and rhythm of each sketch grasped the 
attention of most if not all of the audience. 

By choosing common everyday events 
and sifting out the more obvious qualities 
Michael was able to strike home and pro- 
voke emotions with every skit. Notable 
exceptions were the Trained Flea, a mime 
which anthropomorphized a flea, and the 
Newspaper which inspired several inter- 
pretations all of which an expression of 
confusion rather than understanding. 

During intermission the audience was 
treated to several selections of "Classical 
Cartoon Music" (which is not to be con- 
fused with "Classical Hieroglyphic Music") 
performed by Michael's magnificent mu- 
sicians, Blegen and Sayer. With titles such 
as Money (not by Pink Floyd), "Marvin 
Mork and His Two Wheeled Tricycle", 
"Garden Girl", "And Many Others", they 
delighted, dumb-founded, impressed and 
teased all with simple facts of life. Their 
genius and technique came across in this 
interlude without the distraction of Mic- 
hael's precise routines. It was their music 
that lended Michael's compositions life, 
vitality and an ethereal quality of deep 
satisfaction. 

Overall the Michael Hennessy Mime and 
Music Theater was the best ASLLU spon- 
sored activity to date. It incorporated an 
educational, cultural experience with 
thought provoking laughter. 



127 



ASLLU ELECTIONS 
HADLEY OVER 
ASARE! 

BAUER WINS TIGHT 
CM DIRECTOR RACE. 



This election was controversial to say 
the least. Ben Asare, the friendly and 
highly popular president of the Interna- 
tional Student Club mounted a strong 
campaign to wrest the Presidency of ASLLU 
from the ever popular Campus Ministries 
Div., Steve Hadly. 

At first Hadly was the expected shoo-in. 
Steve had administrative support and the 
support of nearly all students involved in 
campus Student Government. 

Ken Lombard, ASLLU president, also 
formally lended his support to Steve as 
did Hadlys' many Campus Ministries 
friends and peers in the close knit Div. of 
Religion. 

Asare was able to wage a surprizing 
showing and rally many foreign and minor- 
ity students. He had the use of excellent 
Public Relations materials and posters. 
A controversial point in the elections was 
the debate sponsored by "Student Center 
Forums." Hosted by Jim Robison and 
Elmer Geli, the debate showed a sharp 
contrast in goals and issues. Hadly came 
across as highly qualified, informed and 
reliable. Asare was felt to have been vague 
and unsure of specific goals and programs 
for ASLLU. After the debate, opinion 
seemed to turn in Hadlys direction. All in 
all it was a fine race between two fine 
opponents. 



It was a very very tight race for CM Direc- 
tor until Mike Bauer squeked by with a win. 







128 




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ASLLU OFFICERS OF 1977-78 
A REFLECTION . . . 



This year's cabinet was a diverse collection of individuals with many strengths and weaknesses. As with all organizations there uere 
cooperators, innovators, and implementors. There were friendships formed and friendships destroyed. Many plans were proposed. 
pushed and refused, but we cannot expect all things to run as expected, least of all student government. We can at least expect it to 
run, and it usually does. 





Ken Lombard, President 

He began his term with many new ideas, 
but ideas cost in time and money. The most 
visable of these were the remodeled Stu- 
dent Center and the resurrected Yearbook. 
These projects were accomplished in the 
face of changing personnel and budget re- 
strictions. Ken's calm manner helped his 
cabinet pull through many shakings and he 
remained a friend to all. 

Wes Ferrari, Vice President 

A strong Vice President that tried to get 
things done quickly and efficiently, to por- 
tray student opinion to the Dean of Stu- 
dents, and to get the Senate to reflect stu- 
dent desires and dreams, he resigned under 
duress saying it was due to personal prob- 
lems and academic pressures. Yet in spite 
of losing his office he continued to accept 
the responsibility of a job he began — this 
included Speaker's Chair. 



Holly Fredricksen, Chairman Pro-Tern 

A freshman senator with no previous 
ASLLU experience, she was elected Senate 
Pro-Tern without knowing that by the end 
of first quarter she would be thrust into 
the role of ASLLU Vice President with the 
resignation of Wes Ferrari. In spite of a 
lack of procedural experience, Holly was 
able to mold the Senate into a think tank 
for future projects, a role which was new to 
the Senate. 

Dan Flores, Treasurer 

One of the few officers that kept his cool 
and mental health during periods of con- 
fusion and budget over-runs, he maintained 
a firm yet easy-going posture towards all 
cabinet members. He was directly respon- 
sible for innovating monthly reports on 
ASLLU financial status as opposed to the 
usual quarterly reports. 





129 




Steve Hadley, Campus Ministries 

A master at recruiting people to work for 
no pay and yet have them work with dedi- 
cation, Steve Hadley was able to set up a 
staff along standard managerial lines. His 
programs almost always had good atten- 
dance and participation. He was able to 
remove, for the first time in years, the stig- 
ma of "the Holy-Holy Club" atmosphere. 



Danny Montero, Social Activities 

Plagued from the beginning by a con- 
stant lack of help, little response to new 
activities later on in the year, a schedule of 
events that fluctuated radically due to the 
difficulty of handling all aspects of social 
activities alone, and a lack of P.R. due to 
unfinalized dates, social activities had dif- 
ficulty generating support this year. In a 
difficult, often criticized and thankless 
post, Danny did his best. 



Julie So'Brien, Student Services 

Julie began her job with such good 
promise, a larger budget and plans to give 
the student more information about serv- 
ices available to them. With this goal she 
secured the original RTA bus passes. But 
due to other committments she felt that 
she would be unable to do her position, 
justice and resigned. 







Wayne Schmedel, Student Services 

Wayne, for four busy weeks, attempted 
to continue Julie's new programs and run 
College Bowl. This proved too much to 
handle and he too resigned with the bus 
passes going to Security and College Bowl 
being cancelled. 



Ron Esperson, Criterion Editor 

Though bothered by a staff that regu- 
larly changed (went to Thousand Oaks, 
quit, etc.) Ron was still able to meet dead- 
lines consistently. Early in the year people 
wondered if Ron Sanders or Ron Esperson 
was editor but Esperson kept his paper un- 
der control. The photography was above 
average in quality, clarity, and diversity, 
but the paper was critisized for a drop in 
writing quality. 




130 



Suzette Catalon, Public Relations 

After several weeks had passed and there 
still was not a public relations director, 
Suzette Catalon decided she would do the 
posters for just one ASLLU activity. She 
didn't know what she was getting into! Be- 
fore the week was out, she was appointed 
the new P.R. director. In the weeks that 
followed she attempted to keep the stu- 
dents up to date in spite of receiving infor- 
mation, too little and too late. 



Sandy Arct, Freshman Orientator 

Though Sandy went $400 over budget, 
she pulled off the most satisfying and in- 
formative Freshman Orientation ever. 
Careful planning during the summer paid 
off. Thanks Sandy! 




Harold Avila, Parliamentarian 

Harold, the man responsible for elec- 
tions, can be credited with the smooth 
handling of the elections as well as one of 
the largest voter turnouts in La Sierra 
Campus history. He was presented several 
problems which he ably handled, including 
an accusation of conflict of interest in the 
officer elections (with Harold running for 
Vice President yet being an ex-officio 
member of the elections board), he tact- 
fully averted conflict by arranging for his 
duties to be smoothly taken over by Bob 
Grant. 



Hale Kuhlman, Film Society Director 

Even though Hale rarelj showed up at 
the offices, he regularly showed films on 
schedule and attracted individuals of all 
types. In one of the less glamorous ASLLL 
jobs, Hale Kuhlman did an effective and 
efficient job. 



Elmer Geli, Student Center Director 

Entering this post with more energy 
and perhaps a greater penchant for spend- 
ing money than others, Elmer, through a 
judicious spending of funds recarpeted 
the student center, brought us better TV 
reception, video games, and a "crowded" 
and active on-campus place of entertain- 
ment. He also directed the very popular 
Ours After Hours programs and Between 
the Lines. 



Lcnore Magsulit, Secretary 

"If you have a problem, go see Lenore", 
was the standard line whenever any officer 
had problems within himself. Not only did 
Lcnore do a suburb job as ASLLU secre- 
tary, she also filled the roles of typist for 
hire (free) and local counselor. Why did she 
stay when others left? She had a sense of 
duty and a need to fulfill commitments. 



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Bertha "Crispy Critter" Cat 
The ASLLU Mascot 

Bertha will go down in history as being 
the first and only cabinet member to go in- 
to temporary retirement second quarter 
due to pregnancy. She had five kittens. 



Carl Opsahl, Inside Dope Editor 

The editor for the second year in a row. 
Carl Opsahl again produced a student 
directory that was of high quality and was 
highly informative. 



Robert Ta\lor, Visions Editor 

The head of the first yearbook in six 
years, he provided the driving force behind 
this year's yearbook. But he should have, 
and stepped on more toes than any other 
officer. He was heard to remark when he 
came back from Spring break, "Where's 
my mess. I can't work in an organized 
office!" 




Abel Whittemore. Public Relations 

Pained by what he saw as lack of com- 
munication amongst the officers. Abel 
Whittemore became disillusioned as time 
went on. This disillusionment over the lack 
of a firm social activities schedule and 
upper echelon support brought about 
Abel's resignation. 



131 



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132 




ASLLU 
SENATE 77-78 
FRUSTRATIONS AND 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS. 

SENATE-HIGH POINTS 



This year's Senate was the most contro- 
versial in years. For the first time since the 
sixties the Senate kept on asking why and 
how? 

Refusing to be the fund raising, promo- 
tional organizational group this year's Sen- 
ate quietley went about it's business of 
carrying student opinion to the administra- 
tion. 

Leslie Beebe, Village, was a stickler for 
procedural details in a year when it seemed 
that parlimentary rules went out the window . 

Phyllis Boyd, South Hall, was a small 
freshman with big ideas. Phyllis kept on 
during the year surprising both senators and 
administrators with her bills, speeches, 
and proved she would not be intimidated 
in her quest to liberalize restrictive campus 
rules. 

Elmer Geli, Student Center Director, 
said the wrong things at the right times, 
something that kept the Senate laughing 
through the worst meetings. His witty 
comments tinged with sarcasm kept the 
senate buzzing and the administrators 
squirming. 

Bob Grant, took over the elections when 
Harold Avila, Parlimentarian, ran for 
office. Bob was conscience of the Senate. 
Abrasive yet usually right on. 

Zoya Jahaheri represented a growing 
awareness on the part of village students 
in ASLLU affairs. Zoya was chairperson 
of the Student Center Committee and also 
ran a successful fashion show for AS LLC 

From Angwin Hall came three female 
senators who changed the image of the 
quiet non-speaking females in Senate. 
Janet Samarin, Janet Staubach, and Cathy 
Smith all had something to say and made 
many contributions during the year. 

Suzy Takeuchi continued presenting bill 
after bill to the senate and the administra- 
tion at great personal sacrifice. 

Robert Taylor, the Yearbook Editor was 
ghost writer to over 501 of the years legis- 
lation. Robert would become aware of a 
problem and start writing. Senators came 
to recognize his easy casual style of writ- 
ing. Robert's many observations and com- 
ments during the meeting poignantly often 
illustrated the lack of morale among this 
year's senate group. 

The lack of administrative support was 
a burden to the group as it effectively 
nuetralized the Senate to nothing. 

What did the Senate accomplish' 1 about 
20 bills. 17 of which were found impossible 
to implement by the administration. Per- 
haps the students could have tried harder 
to work with the administration to gain 
more student rights. Yet, it was difficult 
to find any senators that bothered to co- 
operate with an administration that re- 
fused to consider an\ viewpoint other 
than its own. 



133 





CRITERION-OUR VOICE 

With a change in masthead, this year's Criterion moved 
out with a sports section, increased photographic coverage 
(including a full front page photo), and weekly personality 
sketches. The personality sketches, pioneered by Mike Ooley 
constantly and accurately brought us to know the inner per- 
son of several faculty and administrators. 

The addition of a true sports page gave the Criterion bal- 
ance and lended a more personal touch to the usual "all 
news" newspaper. Ron Esperson, the editor and man re- 
sponsible for the change, believes that this gave the students 
a truer picture of campus life. Life, after all, is not all books. 
Coupled to the sports page were often photo essays that at- 
tracted and kept student attention. Sparking the imagination 
with an understanding of what actually happened, Ron suc- 
ceeded in expanding the Criterion's reading audience, some- 
thing that hasn't happened in years! 

Acting in its traditional role, the Criterion also continued 
in supporting reasonable student requests as well as sup- 
porting ASLLU organizations (senate, yearbook, certain 
clubs, etc.) in their quest for excellence. Sometimes after the 
staff expected the administation to hit the ceiling (especially 
after the Student Government/Administration cartoon, 
"NO") but the guillotine never fell. 

As the most vocal and visible of the ASLLU publications, 
the Criterion tenaciously maintains its freedom of the press 
status. To be anything else would be a slap in our forefather's 
faces. 



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At present, two archery classes shc- 
rows at targets mounted on b"" -t 
e bails of hay is the track o- \ /\ 

When classes are in -tiY ..ors and students must yell 

:ease fire" when*" /»Q^1a the line of fire. Instructors have 

ough to do (5 -^ents from . injuring themselves and 

her clas«' , t-*l(\y9 -^ in g to worry about people on the track. 
Ac <t --1 \* _*; sources, it has been about three years since 
^Y| Qi* ^ithery safety was brought to the attention of the 
| Y\ .jn. And here we are, three years later, sitting on a 
tei .*ily disasterous situation. 
It appears 
I adm 
cost $ 
iuranc 
vsuit 
If tht_^ 

ckstop, a. small investment in a few signs could be u 
;gers to stay off the track during set time periods. If 
re made obvious and backed up by security, this 
eviate the problem until a permanent and safe arch 
istructed. 

Whatever the administration does, now is the time to 
oo late. -i 

iysical labor and a non- Medicine graduates. 

itional, individually-adapted "Guests" will stay for a month I -p/he big Ua 

mmunity ministry are all parts in one large building, par- enrollment at LLU. Registration 

the college plan. .ticipating in hydro-and physical ' was a bree2e CO mp a red to the 

A nation-wide board of Ad- 'therapy sessions, health bargaining process of registration 

ntist educators are now plan- education lectures and plenty of at tne State University. I learned 

ng the curriculum. There will outdoor exercise. A natural diet a lot of new regulation <; o~ J - ' 

three areas of major study; of unprocessed, unrefined foods-- r h, f t l • " _- -■ 

:alth education, teacher. fruits, grains "1 .^ 1 _1 /~^~W* 

ucation and religion. An art""- 1 _^ ^ _^_ ^^ MA 111 vyj_ 



CU11U1 »»»»»• ^jj^w^^.— 

Asst. Editor E>aneJ. Griffin 

Copy and Layout Editor Ron Sanders 

Photo Editor Byron Domingo 

Advertising Manager David White 

Secretary Tami Howard 

Advisor Neal Stevens 



ar 



to mask the ar.«h" 



at 

iec 

wr 

nee of 

, not 

elry 

re-but 

mo 

ling cou 

How nice it is to have su< 
— r* .t » ~» r ~~„ ~-~ , Ul f ^ 

•-0 go think it is beautiful • a hean-shaped necklace handm 

dorm freely at: person gives up meat betajby a special person because : 



senate 



a stumbling hold. 



feels it is something he dconsidered jewelry and there: 
u Viis life for God, bi un christian. 

u ' c he Yes. Loma Linda was a surp 
""' out a lot of i 




function ot nidM 

child is snug in her bed because 

p.m. The de?"- 1 



n 
urr 



rinil" 



An open 



letter 



to 



RH Piersoi 

1 % # J_ _»_• -*r^^ jua needs to open 



The Rosager 



-^usnness," testifies 

r > edericks. "You come to a point vmnasr "" 

„ Ji& ned to meet theiere you've done all vo" • 

those who are over- en you've got tn 

" n d weight, suffer from pulmonary nd and e> 

diabetes or "We're \ 




any a new lease m right 



life 



acin-i "Tatio needs 
11 allow 
odel-tyr 
tween these 
idem body of 
'0 will be encour 
r the highest 

llectual development possible-- Retirement 

Christ. College 

Close Ties with Church I For those persons ready 

This self-supporting work is retire yet who long for °- 
;ing developed in close jinvolvment in 
operation with the Adventist ' 
lurch and does not plan to be ' < 

opposition to or in 
;tition with pre-f"" : 
stitutions 
Elders V 
eal W 

esidentf h\ \J** -*y Con- the Institute will be made< : 
rence, 1 >• ,med Weimar and available to those who feel c'' 
-iced their support of the work to Weimar. 
:ing done there. The College, r»- 



ntinues, 
re 



f\ l> %/ ^ut, even 

J- -on't jAi; retained b 



J ouiIinn nq 



jua needs to open 
friends with 

here sc 

behind w 

/riginally they w 

cd because they belie 

, were following what C 

')uld like them to be. 




mimstrv 




ds 




at 



asiviiig 



lacking his crown," B " r (Adventist need to) le 
lAli retained his crowning humor. 3 accept others who have a be 
anyone f " I didn't know he could fight 1 God but worship Him 
pirit mov t hat well after 10 round ," Alinother day. Your way is not 
said after the fight to newsmen. nl >' right way. nor is mine. 
' -" irher did you... I lost fairot judge me as an Adventis 
^oinks. I did m not one - but I am a child 
^ f J lost.^°d like you. Do not let 

iter. Nearly c,v.. 0r ~*--C Lf~-*fi zoning tor your beliefs w 

-all groups of n r wi^ v 
an 40 persons come to erh tforD*. M. # # f ^ : «jkfiil th; 

-'| a spiritual refreshing and ..wW Dorrs sradTum n,*" J s i IT: beca 

^in- and m mountain air. The 
active elders. Ul g roU p fello- 
apartments in ament 



Pre. 




W 



roup tello'- *•-! 

*-| l\V ^nd fean Ch 



(Otfi 

' 1 .s clear th; 




t tor d 
Dons stadium n 
or. To many, the king wa2, «-- "^-^y ■ / uc ^y 
-he's merelv taking a 3 meet m >' i»^V usband 
gm apaiimcm:, m u.ment to <%lfLM ' s clear that the time is right lst 'atch please! I have met m ; 

large building near the centeer of ip t ua I ^ VV^ - the ordination of women ^rrific friends, but there is alw 

ithin the Seventh-day Adventist n WGHTOUSNESS BY FAJ 
nd feati Church. A church that recognizes b Notmn § is more centnd to 
-en weekend is a woman as holding a position 1 cor Porate beliefs of voung 

i ventism th*n is the article 
' justification by faith alone. ( 
samplings suggest a consen 
that Adventists are all-toget 
too legalistic in outlook Yoi 
Adventism is finding it diffic 
to incorporate this perfectior 
view into a positive, persoi 
lgion. Tragically, we have w 



'Current Issues much superior 



ndventist 



con- 



to that of the 

ation by Faith" with M average gospel minister is in-" 

TO den and "The Man Who consistant in denying ordination 

with Edward Heppen to those so called. We recognize 

few of the retreat to the cultural implications of this 

* -* *he spring of move, however we also recognize 

value of local origination of 

rhe 



s. 



The ultimate goal of Weimar most comr' ■* 

stitute is to become a powerful • ministr ; - ^-^ O j 
:y mission outpost, reaching out ed- \^1 

touch lives in the Sacrament - 1 lSm 

ea through its d ; -tl pV ^ vc re ad 
ograms. ^ A \^ J Wt havr ^ 

tmton by faith alo.\\Qy> ^ via written page 
er express our conce, lfV^-rought us to where we art. _....„,.,. 

mjd<Tlf* eolo P c ^ am ^ Javc n °tcd the progression from =r person covers meals, houj^ - • c t / f A-/ , /' 

suet tet T m ' T y T g 1Cadershi P t0 a middle'eaker's expense si there are vcJZZ *lCltfn*«^ caT<ed b v 

Ze'nf l?«r rg li n T nl ^ not y« advanced to'the em V^/» P^fcSon 

~ f > 18^ ZZ^ iT r hY , COntr ° ] to Health Conditioning Cent, clear in young AdventifAmenca -quired. SL^tT*. 

iw* for /ustamstcrnl control. Maybe we' Scheduled to open in Apr today. Let us advance in step with s Wst a disregard for the la 
-ave gone to far. 8, the Health Conditio! society and in accordance to our ratn er we suggest law in its tn 

doctrine. > function, to point out sin. 



; . Weiormngs. a tVto . <~-0 ^^6/7//X> / /^/ ' rd ' g " 

there are areas wi llu /* ^^l/D^^l- 

not yet advanced to the exit... J ^' til 



waited since 
r <h a discussion. 



■d^^- CXLe£^ 6J, 



s~K^, 



■<-^_+---f 



VISIONS 1977-78 
ROBERT TAYLOR ED. 





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VISIONS' STAFF 1977-1978 

Robert Dunn, Sponsor 

Robert Taylor, Editor 

Harold Avila, Asst. Ed. /Business Mgr. 

Tom Macomber, Photo-Layout Editor 

Photography 

Kenny Avila, Darkroom Asst/Photographer 

Martyn Charron, Photographer 

Ronald Crandall, Darkroom Asst./ 

Photographer 
Dexter Emoto, Portrait Photographer 
Donnice Evans, Photographer 
Dan Seto, Darkroom Coordinator/ 

Photographer 
Woody Totten, Darkroom Asst./Photographe. 

Layout and Production Copy 
Marjan Bentley, Portrait Layouts 
Elmer Geli, Activity Layouts/Copy Writer 
Karen Jacobs, Copy Writer 
Lorri Paulauskis, Portrait Layout Design 
Nanci Roberts, Layout Asst. /Typist 
Judy Strutz, Portrait Copy Editor 
Suzy Takeuchi, Layout/ Portrait Typist/Copy 
Editor 

Secretarial/Typing 

Patty Ibarra, Typist/ Portrait Layouts 
Teresa Umali, Copy Writer. Typist 
Russell Chevrier, Typist 

Special thanks to Richard Sparks for the 
theme pictures and David White for the mu- 
sical groups. 



137 



FOCUS 77 

A NEW CONTEST 

WITH CLASS 




INSIDE DOPE '77 
CARL OPSAHL, ED. 

INSIDE DOPE 

PROMISES AND EXCUSES 

This year, Editor Carl Upsahl set as his goal 
the notoriety that would come with breaking 
the Dopes infamous speed record for the sec- 
ond year in a row. 

Fate decided differently as Dope production 
dragged and sagged to a virtual standstill and 
finally arrived 2 months overdue. 

The photographic quality of the book won no 
awards though the few of us who remember the 
fiasco from 3 years ago couldn't have been more 
appreciative. 

Christie Hatton did much of typing while 
Karen Hamer was Editor of the outside Dope 
section. Steve Murphy was in charge of organiza- 
tion and Sandra Opsahl of PUC was contracted 
to the cover. 

Abel Whittemore, Bob Grnat, Donna Mus- 
grove, Harold Avila, Max Owens, and Tommy 
Sykes were of much general help. 

Typists included Lenore Magsulit, Denver 
Driesberg, Rong Chung, Lita Simpliciano, Wena 
Chung, and Yen Kim. 

Barbara Scharffenberg led a great crew of 
layout workers in getting the book put together. 

Administrators and Faculty also were of great 
help in Production. Mr. Basel was involved in 
the programming to a large extent. Mrs. Masch- 
meyer, Dr. Hammerslough and Mr. Welch were 
also of help in various production aspects. Mr. 
Tracy Teele edited unacceptable statements 
from the final print. 

Though never quite what we would like the 
Dope to be, it is a valued part of the easy going 
LLU lifestyle. Many a student found it to be the 
best way to meet that really special person. It 
made life a little more easier to know that Linda 
Abbey was born on June 5 or that Kathy Robb 
considers herself to be a "Rowdy" individual. 
Girls were thrilled to know that Lewis Rodgers 
is "Not a Crook" or that John Campbell needed 
a "break" from them. .. 

The Dope is a look book, a guide book, a cal- 
endar, a statistical reference, and an all around 
help to living at La Sierra. Really now, where 
else could you as easily locate where Esther Vil- 
lareal lives, what she is majoring in, how tall 
she is, the color of her hair and eyes, how she 
enjoys dating, where she's from, and her birth- 
day without ever letting her know? 

The Dope is neat. 




Steven Carr's Photograph (above) won the $200 Grand prize. 




mi 



MEN 



■■■■■« 




CONTENTS 



STAFF 


2 


CONTENTS 


3 


KEY 


4 


LEGEND 


5 


HELPFUL INFORMATION .*> 


6 


FACULTY AND STAFF fgf \ 


14 


WOMEN ffS<J 


20 


OUTSIDE DOPE r\9 


44 


MEN r^ML^^ 

ADS ^-Oi>£j>: 


54 


' 78 


STUDENT MISSIONARIES 


84 


BIRTHDAYS 


86 


INDEX 


88 


STATISTICS 


96 


DIRECTORY 


102 







138 




SPEAKER'S 
CHAIR 77-78 

JULIAN BOND 
JOSEPH 

SORRENTINO 

SPEAKERS CHAIR 

Speaker's Chair this year could be con- 
sidered a study in contrasts. Julian Bond, 
the Black, straight-faced, cynic educated 
the masses on the defacto segregation 
which continues in this "free land". B\ 
telling anecdotes on his trials and tribula- 
tions that he faced in getting his seat in the 
state senate of Georgia, Bond drew audi- 
ences together by reaching into each per- 
son's sense of fairness and showing us how 
decrepid humanity really is. 






I 



On the other hand, Joseph Sorentino 
dropped all his titles, his power, and closed 
his distance by making himself so warm, 
earthy, so human that everyone had to like 
him and what he had to say. By taking the 
stand that rehabilitation is only for those 
that are not habitual offenders and are 
young enough to change, Sorentino sur- 
prised all by taking a hard line to the re- 
cidivistic criminal. 

For once. Speaker's Chair was worth 
going to. 



139 



COMMUNION 
WITH 
GOD 







140 





^— — III 



FELLOWSHIP 
WITH 
GOD 





141 



CAMPUS 
MINISTRIES 



A BREAKTHROUGH YEAR 

"It's not the Holy, Holy club anymore", 
was the slogan this year that bought Cam- 
pus Ministries to the center of Campus 
life this year. More students than ever be- 
fore came out and participated in programs 
old and new to the university. 

Why this year? Why did Campus Min- 
istries excell as never before? One reason 
certainly can be the fact that the Dir. of 
Campus Ministries last year was Ken Lom- 
bard, Religion major. Ken was this years 
ASLLU President and saw to it that Cam- 
pus Ministries was given a large role in 
student affairs. Under Ken's leadership 
Campus Ministries broadened its base and 
received much campus recognition. 

But it was this years Director, Steve 
Hadley who came to be identified with 
Campus Ministries more than any other 
student on campus. Under Steve, old pro- 
grams were eliminated, new exciting ones 
were added. People were encouraged to 
try everything at least once. Through a 
variety of resources Campus Ministries 
encouraged clubs to have their own out- 
reach and provided funds for the BSA 
Branch Sabbath School and the popular 
Sabbath Afternoon Program coordinated 
by Jodi Davis at the new Student Center. 

Finally the two people who are foremost 
in making Campus Ministries outstanding 
are Chaplian Osborne and his secretary, 
Mrs. Rosemarie Osmunson. 

Chaplian Osborne was alway there to 
help when we needed him. No problem was 
huge or tiny. From problems with Deans, 
who were unfair, to financial hasseles, to 
figuring out program schedules, the Chap- 
lain never failed to meet Students needs. 

Likewise with Mrs. Osmunson. So dear 
to the heart of every student missionary 
and every theo major who has forgotten a 
pencil to Dr. Landa's Church History. 
Every Campus Ministries program director 
who needed a message delivered had to 
depend on Mrs. Osmunson. Always smil- 
ing on the outside (you know she smiles 
on the inside even more!) she is truly an 
asset to the university. Share with us now, 
on the following pages some of the unique, 
both new and old Campus Ministries pro- 
gram that made this year special. 







142 








HilBP»^"t 












---'•• f -3 




1 


II 

II 

1 u 


i 
Hi 





CAMPUS MINISTRIES 
IT'S NOT THE 
HOLY HOLY 
CLUB ANYMORE 



ONE TO ONE 

Directed by Elmer Geli and Ron Sanders. 
One to One is a unique method of Com- 
munication between LLU students and 
prominent church figures. Once a quarter 
students are given the chance to dialogue 
in an open, unrestricted way with people 
important to the SDA church structure. 
One to One was unrehearsed, sometimes 
painful, maybe embarassing, but always a 
growing experience for sides. Speakers 
for this year were John J. Robertson, 
Robert H. Pierson, and Geoffrey Paxton. 

CHRISTIAN GROWTH PROVIDED 
A WIDE SPECTRUM OF SERVICES 

This new campus Ministries department 
became an umbrella for former activities 
that were now grouped into one coordinated 
department of CM outreach. Special serv- 
ices such as communions, Bible Studies. 
optional worships. Friday Night after- 
glows, movies were untied under the lead- 
ership of Vic Anderseon. 

CAMPUS MINISTRIES AND 
STUDENT CENTER 
A TEAM UP THAT WAS GOOD FOR 
EVERYBODY 

The New Student Center became the 
home of a new CM activity this year as 
Jodi Davis took charge of Student Center 
afternoon programming. 

Jodi provided one program every month 
of different on campus talent including the 
SoDA group, The Mark Voegle Mime 
Company, the afternoon of Praise session. 
Even though Jodi started out small, her 
programs grew until Student Center Sab- 
bath Programming became a separate 
department. 

Other Sabbath Programming was pro- 
vided by Francisco Mowatt and his tre- 
mendously successful Music Ministries 
Student Center Concert Scries. Beside 
Jodi Davis, Bruce Kim. Jim Robison, 
and Elmer Geli were on dut\ every Sabbath 
afternoon second and third quarters so 
that students could enjoy recorded music 
and relaxation at the Center. 



143 



A VARIETY OF CAMPUS MINISTRIES PROGRAMS 
MEET THE NEEDS OF THE UNIVERSITY 
THE COMMUNITY AND THE CHURCH 



SABBATH AFTERNOON OUTINGS 

What exactly is a fault, a tar pit, or 
Forest Lawn? On Saturday afternoons 
Susan Williams leads 60-70 eager students 
to various parks and museums in the 
L.A. area. While there the students engage 
in song service followed by a tour or a talk 
on the place they're visiting. The response 
this year has been better than in the past 
as evidenced by the full bus which leave 
every Saturday afternoon. 

CM OUTREACH AT INA ARBUCKLE 
WAS A LEARNING EXPERIENCE 

Under the direction of Marie Hand, 
CM continued its highly valued help at 
the Ina Arbuckle elementary school. The 
Big Brother/Sister was a valued part of 
student outreach. 

WEEKS OF PRAYER: CAREFUL 
PLANNING PAID OFF! 

Coordinated by the ever efficient, easy 
going, good willed Steve Mason, Week of 
Prayer was successful both fall and spring. 
Fall speaker was Benjamin Reeves. Spring 
speaker was Smuts Van Rooyan. (See week 
of Prayer, page 104) 

CONVALESCENT HOMES OUTREACH 
BRIGHTENED 
UP MANY LIVES BOTH YOUNG 
AND OLD 

The CM visits to area convalescent 
homes became important not only to the 
senior citizens whose lives were brightened 
up but also to the young folk who spent 
sabbath afternoon bringing cheer. Larry 
Clonche did a good job of leading these 
groups. 

PRAYER BREAKFAST, A STEP TOO 
FAR 

With the many successes of a successful 
year, Steve Hadley, the organizer of CM 
Prayer Breakfasts felt that he could go a 
step beyond the routine worships and sab- 
bath afternoon programming. He envisioned 
people getting up at 6:30 and holding 
prayer breakfasts where they could fel- 
lowship together before starting the day. 
However, attendance proved dismal as they 
went on and finally were stopped all to- 
gether. 





rtt® 




144 





' 




WORLD MISSIONS HAD GLOBAL 
IMPACT 

Under the leadership of Kris Lorenz. 
World Missions took on a new importance 
as students were made aware of the im- 
portance of the Student Missionary pro- 
gram. Not only in foreign countries but 
here in United States, LLU students are 
proving their value in God's service. One of 
Kris' priorities was to let the students 
missionaries know that they weren't for- 
gotten. Therefore everyone from Susie 
Smith in Nigeria to Terry Whitted in Ire- 
land to Jarvis Howell in Japan was kept up 
to date as we here at home watched the 
bulletin board in La Sierra Hall for news 
from around the world. 

MUSIC MINISTRIES 

Formerly known as Afterglow, Music 
Ministries this year has blossomed under 
the able leadership of Francisco Mowatt. 
Originally a program primarily dedicated 
to sing-alongs after vespers in various 
buildings around campus, it has grown to a 
vibrant, living outreach of Campus Minis- 
tries. It entertains students while providing 
spiritual uplift. 

FRIDAY NIGHT VESPERS 

Although this is a field where little stu- 
dent input can be put in, Ray French has 
tried to brighten Friday Evening with a 
collage of various types of spiritual uplift. 
Memorable vespers include Keith Knoche. 
Hamilton Avila's multimedia presentation. 
Doug Dorrough's talk "From Athens to 
Adventism", and SoDA's alumni home- 
coming vespers. 

PRISON MINISTRIES 

A mission outreach to Banning Rehabil- 
itation Center, headed by Don Taliaferro, 
it has left every Saturday morning at 8:15. 

Encouraged by remarks such as "The 
Lord didn't put me in here to punish me. 
The Lord put me in, that I might find Him." 
students work with the men to try to 
straighten out the men's lives. 



145 



THE NEW 
STUDENT CENTER 







A WORD OF MANY THANKS 






The New Student Center ranks along 
with this yearbook you are holding as 
one of the most difficult yet worthwhile 
things that your ASLLU has done for 
several years. It would be sad indeed if 
you the students did not know about the 
cooperative effort that made the Student 
Center come alive after a decade of in- 
activity. 

Ken Lombard, Dan Flores, Lenore Mag- 
sulit, and Robert Taylor of the ASLLU 
acbinet constantly expressed support of 
the project realizing the cost and yet de- 
ciding it was worth it. 

My staff; Jodi Davis, Marjan Bentley. 
Jim Robison, Bruce Kim, and Jamie Walk- 
er were loyal friends who realized that 
friendship tranzcended diasgreements. 
They were a devoted bunch of people and 
I am proud to have known them. Each of 
them accomplished much in their own area. 

Deans Teele and Dickerson must be 
thanked for even allowing such a project 
to happen. Despite tense disagreements, 
budget overruns, and the way I goaded 
them in Senate, they believed in me and 
the idea of making the Center a focus of 
campus life. 

My family, especially my sister. Eunice 
Hankins of Cerritos, stood by me when my 
grade did not. Iris Landa and Dr. Richard 
Banks kept me and the Center together 
from week to crisis filled week. Suzy 
Takeuchi loved me. 

Lewis Rodgers helped in so many \va\s. 
As a counselor, mathematician, designer, 
composer, scientist, theologian, writer, 
talented artist, employee and most impor- 
tant great friend. 

Lastly, Abel Whittemore deserves men- 
tion. Abel played so many different roles. 
Tattler, informant, friend, enemy. Devil's 
advocate, defender, always the confronted 
the realist, the model I strove to be. 

And finally, you the student. 

It's there under the Commons. 

It was done, presently is. and for some 
time, will be all for you. 

Many thanks. 



_ OW'p.^JAxJ^ 



Elmer Daniel Geli 

78-79 Student Center Director 



14- 



AS THE SCHOOL 

YEAR GOES BY 

THE CENTER 

BECOMES THE 

PLACE TO GO. 





r *m 






148 









THE NEW STUDENT CENTER 

This year the Student Center took on a new role in our campus 
life. According to Elmer Geli, the one responsible for the planning, 
its purpose is to give the student an on-campus place to relax and 
enjoy himself. With new artistic pieces, games, records, programs 
and a working sound system, there are hopes that the "New Stu- 
dent Center" will be a well-accepted addition to the college. 

On January 22, 1978, a Sunday evening, there was an open house 
to encourage everyone to come down and see all the changes going 
on. There was a good turn out, with about 300 people showing, and 
there was enough going on to keep everyone busy. Doughnuts and 
milk were served; television, air hockey, video games, a foos-ball 
and shuffleboard game, music, and door prizes all had their place 
to make the evening a successful one. All these things add excite- 
ment to a student's life, and the programs which followed had sim- 
iliar success. The Table Tournament, Parfait for Two, Between the 
Lines and Night Cap all have attracted student attention. 

Services provided for the off-campus resident were a place to 
refrigerate lunches, ride maps and an "Underground" bookstore to 
exchange, buy, barter, or whatever, for the books you need. So. 
not only for the student on-campus, but also for the village stu- 
dent, the Student Center offered much more this school vear. 






149 







150 




W2 

3 

■— 

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151 



FLAG FOOTBALL 





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'■"■ ■ ■ 







152 








153 





WOMEN'S 
VOLLEYBALL 




154 




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SOCCER, THE ORIGINAL FOOTBALL GAME 



158 












159 



160 









New Vehicles Purchased by Security 



161 











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162 













163 



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164 



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165 



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168 



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TRAVEL 







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• Seasoned professionals. 

• Anywhere on Anything that Moves. Agent for airlines, railroads, ship lines, car 
rentals, hotels, resorts, and tour operators all over the globe. 

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whether you buy direct from the airline or let us make the arrangements. 

• Your travel reservations and tickets are as close as your telephone. No matter 
where you are, our toll free "HOT LINES" will put you in direct contact with our 

travel counselors. 

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Riverside, CA 92505 Loma Linda, CA 92354 

(714) 687-1234 (24 hrs.) (714) 796-8344 (24 hrs.) or 824-3320 



WASHINGTON, D.C. OFFICE 

(next to the General Conference) 
7000 Carroll Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20012 
(202) 882-1377 

Jim Manning, President and General Manager 



169 



VISIONS-THE TITLE SAYS IT ALL 

In producing this book, the staff ran into several difficulties, often we 
had too little time to correct the errors. You have found in the portrait 
section gaps between photos, large gaps between lines of pictures, and 
differences in picture sizes (we suggest that you use the spaces for signing 
the yearbook). The first set of pictures in each class section (the smaller 
ones) were set alphabetically according to a computer printout given to 
us by Dr. Kutzner from the Office of University Records. This is a mix- 
ture of Inside Dope portraits and Visions' portraits that could not be 
placed in Dr. Kutzners' list. This includes first quarter students and 
those that could not be located in the Inside Dope. The reason that these 
are larger is that they are separate from their class and this is a yearbook 
error. Also, they took time to have their portraits taken. I, as editor felt 
we owed them something. As for those that have been totally left out it 
could be due to the following reasons: That they were not on Dr. Kutzner's 
list and did not have a portrait taken, that their yearbook picture was 
lost when we sent several sets out to be professionally developed, or when 
we printed the portraits they would not print well and there was no Dope 
picture to substitute. 

But in spite of the mistakes, my staff both the new and old, is to be 
credited. Who else would work for menial wages (from nothing to Vie 
an hour) and with just the bare minimum of equipment. Who else could 
have produced a yearbook for just 1 '/> times what most academies spend 
on their. They deserve credit, (see the Visions Staff page) Special thanks 
goes to the crew that worked spring vacation to meet our final deadline 
and all of them worked without pay! They were: Harold and Kenny 
Avila, Marjan Bentley, Martyn Charron, Russ Chevrier, Jodi Davies, 
Elmer Geli, Patty Ibarra, Tom Macomber, Lenore Magsulit, Nanci 
Roberts, Ron Sanders, Mickey Smith, Suzy Takeuchi, Don Taliafero, 
Teresa Umali, and Dr. Robert Dunn, our sponsor. 

Finally, what should a yearbook be, a public relations book, a book 
that is filled hypocritically with only good memories, or a portrait of the 
school. Truth is perhaps the most elusive of man's ideal qualities. Von 
Goethe once said, "It is much easier to recognize error than to find 
truth, error is superficial and may be corrected; truth lies hidden in its 
depths." Yes, in some people's eyes we may have failed to find the truth, 
perhaps even attempted to distort the truth but we have always, whether 
it be in picture or words, sought the truth. Truth often hurts, but when 
praise that is truthful comes, the sweetness is that much greater. Where 
there is criticism, we can improve, we can learn, but perhaps more im- 
portant, we can grow. Photographers often say the camera will not lie, 
it picks up all characteristics. We hope that this edition of Visions has 
painted a true portrait of life at our campus. 




^^^^^L-c^^^^^L- 



Robert William Taylor 
Editor, Visions '78